Sweet Heat Pickle Relish

I love a good pickle relish, especially on grilled bratwurst, but my favorite is to use in ham salad, egg salad, macaroni salad, you get the picture.  Of course, it wouldn’t be from the Rice Household without a little spark of heat.

Here is my recipe for my Sweet Heat Pickle Relish.

Ingredients:  (Makes about 8 half-pints of relish)

  • 4 cups of finely chopped cucumbers (skin on)
  • 2 cups of finely chopped onions
  • 1 green pepper finely chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper finely chopped (or 2 green if you don’t want a red one)
  • 2 jalapeno peppers finely chopped (remove the seeds and membranes for less heat)  *Use Latex gloves when working with any hot pepper.
  • 1/4 cup of pickling salt
  • 2 cups of cider vinegar (canning grade)
  • 3 cups of sugar
  • 1 tsp. celery seed
  • 1 tablespoon of mustard seed

Directions:

  1. I use my Ninja processor to finely chop my items.
  2. Combine the cucumbers, onion and peppers in a very large bowl.
  3. Sprinkle with the pickling salt and toss well (please put on latex gloves to avoid burning your face and eyes).
  4. Cover with ice and cold water and set to the side.
  5. Let the mixture stand for 2 hours minimum but no longer than 6 hours.
  6. Drain well, pressing out the excess water.
  7. Combine your cider vinegar, sugar, celery seed and mustard seed in a kettle.
  8. Bring liquid to a boil to dissolve the sugar.  It is important you stir while heating so the sugar doesn’t burn on the bottom of your kettle.
  9. Add your chopped items to the liquid and simmer for approximately 10 minutes.
  10. Pack into prepared and sterilized half pint (or quarter pint) jars, leaving a half inch head space.
  11. Water bath process for 15 minutes.
  12. Remove from your water bath canner to a place where they can seal.
  13. The pop will confirm your jars have sealed.
  14. Leave alone to settle for 12-24 hours before putting them in your pantry.

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Sweet Heat Pickle Relish

I hope you enjoy this wonderful condiment!

Until Next Time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

 

 

Head Cheese

I was having a conversation with a good friend of mine who raises pigs.  As most of my conversations go, it turned to food.  One of the topics that came up was Head Cheese, looking for a good recipe and the appreciation of this odd concoction.  My grandpa made this after butcher season so I offered to post the process on how to make it the way I know how to make it.

Keep in mind I love pickled pigs feet, scrapple, fried pig skins and other deliciousness of the hills.  Making head cheese is a long drawn out process, but isn’t that the way with anything good?

Okay, so here we go.  I am not going to include pictures because I do not have access to a fresh butchered pig right now, and some of my readers may be grossed out a tad with the process.

First and foremost after the main butchering of the hog is done, comes the head prep.  There are no real rules to this and its done many ways.  The head should be cut in half to make it fit in your boiling pot (outside) a little better.  Hog’s heads are very large.

DAY ONE

The pig’s face needs cleaned (shaved) of random bits of whiskers.  Pigs have very course whiskers.  Clean the pig ears inside and out (yes pigs get ear wax too), grossed out yet?  You will be.  Next are the trotters, otherwise known as the feet and hocks.  Pigs feet are gross, yup, they wallow and step in everything and honestly uncleaned pigs feet STINK.  While trotters are cleaned immediately following butchering, especially if the plan is to make some pickled pigs feet and hocks, they still are gross.  It’s the feet that gives head cheese the thick gel, but you don’t want your cheese to smell like wet locker socks.  To take care of that rinse the feet in hot water to get rid of the ‘juice’.  Next boil a pot of water with some white vinegar.  Blanch the pigs feet for a minute or two and rinse them with cold water, repeat 3 to 4 times.  At this time you’ll notice the wet sock smell will be gone.  Very fresh trotters may not need this much prep, depends on your hog and how you’ve butchered it or had it butchered.

Now on to the fun stuff.  I remember this being done outside in a big boil pot.  Combine your brine in the pot:

  • 2 gallons of water
  • 2 cups of kosher salt
  • 1 cup of sugar
  • 1/2 cup of Pink Salt (processing salt used for headcheese)

Simmer your brine and cool.  Place the head and trotters in the brine to sit overnight.

DAY TWO

Rinse off the brine thoroughly.  I will tell you that the final product will retain quite a bit of salt.

Head cheese is one of those, use what you have type things so I’m going to list some basic items to include.

  • water
  • leeks/ramps
  • onion
  • parsley
  • garlic
  • peppercorns
  • bay leaves
  • nutmeg
  • allspice
  • vinagar

Put everything back in your large pot to cook for 4 hours.  All the flavors will meld together throughout the process.

Maintain a simmer in the pot.  Again, this should be done outside over an open fire, the smoke will lend to the final flavor.

After 4 hours the jawbone should easily separate from the rest of the skull.  The liquid should have a golden hue to it.  Drain the golden liquid out and set in the refrigerator to sit overnight (this will create your jelly).

Next, get comfy, because you are in for a lot of picking and sitting.  Put on some gloves, and once the head and trotters are cooled down enough to handle, spread out a place to pick all the meat off the head and trotters.  Spread your head and trotters out to cool, if you put the in another pot, they will only stay hot.

What to shred and keep is always up for discussion.  However, things like the eyes should be discarded.  The tongue, take out and skin and set it aside wrapped in the refrigerator.  Pull the meat first, you should have plenty to not worry about adding any of the skin or fat.

At the end of the day, cover the pork meat and put in the refrigerator.

DAY THREE  (I told you this was a long process)

Pull out your broth.  It should be gelatin, under a layer of pork fat.  Scrape off the pork fat.  This isn’t as easy as it sounds because the gelatin isn’t very firm.

Heat your gelatin on the stove until it becomes liquid again.  Strain the liquid using a micro-weave cheesecloth this pulls out any impurities.

After straining the liquid, put it back on the burner until it’s reduced by a third.  This takes a while so you can turn your attention to the meat mixture.

Take your pieces of pork and add the seasonings you like.  This is always up for taste.  I remember the seasoning being sage, rosemary and thyme with a little red pepper.  But that is up to you.  Mix your seasoning with your pork with gloves on.  Shred larger pieces as you mix through the meat, keep the fat that is with the meat.

Taste your gelatin once it’s reduced.  If it needs more salt, add it here.  You might also need to add a touch of vinegar, but that’s to taste and preference.

Remember the tongue that was set a side?  Take it out and cube it up.  You can always saved some for sandwiches.  Add in the cubed tongue meat to the pork bits, stir in.

Line your bread loaf pans with clear wrap (you’ll need a several bread loaf pans).  Make sure you use enough to cover the bottom, sides and plenty to wrap over the top.

Now pack in bread loaf pans.  Do not pack super tight, loose but full.  Tap down to where there isn’t much space between bits.

Pour your gelatin mixture over the pork bits in the pans.  Cover with the clear wrap over the top.

Put in the refrigerator to cool.

DAY FOUR

The next day you go to the fridge and there you have it.  Head cheese.

headcheese

It can bee eaten plain, on bread, on crackers, as a sandwich.

Enjoy!

Until Next Time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

 

Ginger Turmeric Kombucha

My journey into making Kombucha (a fermented tea drink which is healthy for the gut) began several months ago, a very good friend gave me the instructions and my first SCOBY which you need to make this wonderful drink.  The SCOBY is living ‘healthy’ bacteria that resembles a flat jelly fish, or the weird creatures from one of the original Star Trek series…. You know the one, admit it.  Anyway, SCOBY is actually an acronym: Symbiotic Culture Of Bacteria and Yeast.  It is what does the job in making your Kombucha.  Ginger and Turmeric are wonderful natural roots that are great for the stomach and inflammation plus they taste YUMMY!

You will need several items just to get started:

  1. Two 1 gallon Glass jars, you can get them at glass jars at amazon
  2. A minimum of 6 swing top bottles, again at Amazon here swing top bottles
  3. Your SCOBY, if you don’t have a friend who has a live one living in her SCOBY hotel, guess what, you can get that from Amazon Too.  SCOBY
  4. 2 cups of sugar
  5. 3 tea bags of green or black tea.
  6. 1 gallon of FILTERED PURE WATER.  Do not, I repeat, to not use tap water, the chlorine and fluoride will kill you SCOBY.
  7. Starter and again if you don’t have a friend who is already brewing, yup, you guessed it go to Amazon.  Kombucha Starter

DIRECTIONS

  1. Brew your sweet tea (sugar, water and tea) and let cool until it is room temperature.  This is important, room temperature.
  2. Once the tea cools (NOT COLD), pour into the large glass jar
  3. Wash your hands with vinegar, yes, you read that correctly this helps you not infect your SCOBY with your germs.
  4. Float the SCOBY on the surface.  It may sink but that is okay.
  5. Gently add in 1-2 cups of the unflavored starter that is at room temperature.
  6. Cover with a breathable cloth but something fruit flies can not get through.  I use a micro mesh cheese cloth and double it.
  7. Tighten with a rubber band.
  8. Sit in a quiet place away from sunlight and cold as cold will slow the growth of the bacteria.  War is okay but not too warm.
  9. Let ferment for 7-10 days (14 has been perfect for us).  This step is very flexible.  The shorter the first ferment the sweeter the brew, the longer the ferment the more sour as the yeast feeds off the sugar from the sweet tea.
  10. Once Ready, wash your hands with vinegar and remove your SCOBY and put in the second jar with some of the tea from the first jar (I put a cup in the first time, now more because if have a bunch in my hotel).
  11. You may need to separate your SCOBYs because they will meld together as you continue to use them.  Each new batch will grow a baby SCOBY to the Mother SCOBY.
  12. Fill your flip top bottles to the bottom of the neck, NOT to the top of the bottle.
  13. For the Ginger Turmeric, I add one teaspoon of diced fresh Ginger and 1 teaspoon of diced fresh turmeric root (both peeled).
  14. Save 2 cups of this batch of the fermented tea (starter) for use for your next batch.  Keep it going by starting at the first step all over again.
    1. I also date these and have now started a rotation of 2 batches soon to be 3 rotation so we have kombucha ready when desired.
  15. Cap each bottle with the top.  And store in a cool dark place. for about 5-7 days.
  16. Once you are ready to enjoy your brew, CAREFULLY open the bottle.
  17. This is why you only fill to the base of the neck, it will FIZZ, alot.  I have found its best to open slowly in a high top bowl.  The sweeter the tea and the higher the sugar content (ginger has a lot) the more it will fizz as a result of the second brew (flavor brew).
  18. Keep in the refrigerator once opened and enjoy!

FLAVORS:

My husband and I love the Ginger Turmeric and really have no want at this time to change it up.  Plus, these roots are great for the gut and inflammation.  However, you can play with flavors, some I’ve seen are Orange Ginger; Strawberry Lemon; Blueberry Lemon; Raspberry; Elderberry and so many others.  Just remember, the more the sugar, the more active the Fizz.

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Now, about your SCOBY Hotel:

I keep my old SCOBYs in a ‘SCOBY Hotel’ which is basically a glass jar with stacks of SCOBYs.  Treat these like the fermenting kombucha by covering them with a breathable cloth and add sweet tea once in a while for food.  They love their sweet teas!  Feed them about once a month or so.  You will also see growth spurts in your SCOBYs at that time.  I rotate them between batches.  There are all kinds of uses for SCOBYs if you get too many teach a friend how to make Kombucha and donate a SCOBY.  They are great to add to a compost bin because of the healthy bacteria.  Mother Earth News just had a recipe in making SCOBY treats (think healthy gummies).

Enjoy your brewing.

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

 

Finding Time

More than often I get questions and comments from friends and colleagues such as: “How do you find time to do everything you do?” or my favorite “Do you ever sleep?”

My morning and evening devotions have found their way to focus on this subject here lately. As a result, I’ve felt the urge to write about it.

Finding time, makes it sound like time is this object that is fleeting and always out of our reach, but in fact, its right there, in our hands at all times.  Time isn’t fleeting, its the choices that we make to cause it to fly away or be used productively.  Time, as well as money, are two things that in reality we have a choice on how to use them.  We can use them wisely, or we can waste them.  A wise person, saves and uses wisely a fool wastes them on fleeting things.

There is also a very big difference in resting and being lazy.  Resting is a refueling, lazy is a waste of resources.  Resting comes as a result of hard work and productivity and finding calm.  Being lazy, is relying on others and outside sources to provide for us.  Do you remember the old story of the Ant and the Grasshopper?  The grasshopper mocked the ant for working so hard in the hot summer months, he insisted on singing, playing and being “lazy”.  The Ant worked diligently to fill its home with food so it could survive the harsh winter to come.  The story has a harsh lesson in the end.  The Grasshopper starved, the ant survived.

Here are some of the ways that allow me to focus on what is truly important, I hope they will help you on your journey.

  1. Wake up early and be consistent throughout the week. rooster
  2.  Morning is very important; how you start it will be the direction of your day.  Because of this, I will slowly wake up.  Laying in bed until my brain isn’t fuzzy anymore and then start moving to get ready.
  3. Make your bed.  Yes, you read that correctly.  Making your bed each morning gives you a sense of accomplishment from the very beginning.
  4. Daily Devotions and prayer.  I start my day with a simple devotion time and prayer to ask for guidance and wisdom in the upcoming day.  I also give thanks for having another day and for my husband.
  5. Keep your clothes simple.  Plan the night before what you will be wearing the next day and know what you have to wear.  In short, don’t have a department store in your closet or most of it in the laundry basket.
  6. For those of us who must work outside of the home as well as at home, remember this always.  We work to live, not live to work.  Your worth is not measured by your job and career.  I make sure that my job (as a programmer in the Tech World) has specific hours.  I work 40 to 50 (if uncontrolled deadlines are needed) a week.  When I am at work, I am at work.  I also allow myself a lunch break, which normally I write or take a walk during good weather.  Breaks are very important for keeping the mind clear.  I also spend the first 10 minutes of every morning, organizing my day with the tasks for that day and moving them along as need be, utilizing an Agile methodology.
  7. For both home and work I have outlined in a journal of what my goals are for the day, nothing lofty, just what needs to be done.  Keep It Short & Simple.
  8. I keep track of what I spend or earn.  This helps me with my budgeting and keeps at the front of my mind to not waste funds.
  9. At home, I keep a strict rule that home is for home and family.  This includes preparing the pantry for winter from our garden and supplementing with items from local farmers.  This is how I am able to can fruits and vegetables in season and bake homemade breads and rolls.
  10. I do not stay “tied” to my phone or computer.  I have found that keeping a written bullet journal handy to keep track of my to-do-lists, ‘shopping’ lists, moods, favorite scriptures and other things is better than being “plugged in”.  This way I’m not distracted to waste time on other “apps”.  I also have found that “helpful” apps are really not helpful at all, in fact they waste time more than anything as you grow to having an obligation to them.
  11. Shopping:  Okay this is a touchy subject.  I know that that the grocery apps are becoming a huge thing now days.  But convenience creates its own demons.  Plan your grocery needs, take the time to go and get only, what is on your list.  You will save money and be more prepared.   Keep a rule that if you don’t have an item in between runs, you will agree to go without, period.  If it is a necessity, say yogurt, make sure you have it on your list to pick up on the grocery run.  Keep your runs to once every other week, maybe longer if you can.  The time and money saved continues to grow. Also, non grocery shopping apps suck you into spending more money and time then what you really need, they speak to your impulse voice.  Its amazing how much you can spend in this way.  UNPLUG.
  12. TV is not a priority.  In fact, for us, it’s rarely on with the exception of some news and maybe an old TV show now and then, even then if my husband and I are enjoying the television, I’m knitting, crocheting or sewing while watching.  We have also cut the cable cord.  This saves us over $100 a month, another frugal tip.  Getting rid of TV will save you a ton of time and a ton of stress.
  13. Understanding your needs versus your wants.  Being plugged into the world tends to make it very confusing on exactly what a want and a need really is.  Especially when the new car, vacation, food, clothing, personal ads are constantly talking to you, even if you say you don’t pay attention to them, they become that little voice saying you need this, you need this to be popular, to be better, to be wanted.  Turn them off.  You don’t NEED any of it.  By not cluttering your life and not spending more and more money on things (wants) the stress will start to melt away.
  14. We eat at home with basic ingredients.  I have heard the argument that it takes too much time to fix good meals at home.  Hogwash!  The time and money you spend driving, waiting, eating and driving home, not to mention the health effects on your body, you could have had a much better meal and not spend half the money and the time.  If you have a tight work schedule, then meal-prep on the weekends.  Plan ahead for the week with a schedule.  This will also help you save money.  Oh, and make your morning coffee at home don’t hit the drive-through.  The money you spend on a good coffee maker and a travel mug, is pennies compared to the monthly cost of that daily/multiple coffee shop run.
  15. Enjoy the moment.  Instead of worrying about what you need to do tomorrow.  Schedule your week so you can sit back and enjoy the moment with the ones you love.  Now, when I say schedule your week, this DOES NOT MEAN DOWN TO THE SECOND!  Keep your load light, make room to enjoy life as life comes to you.  Do NOT over schedule.  Especially, if you have children.  Do not schedule an event every night.  Set limits for you and for them.  Take in a board game, enjoy conversation, a walk, and do chores together.
  16. This one goes with not over scheduling your time.  If you can’t give it at home, then don’t give it away somewhere else.  What does this mean?  If you are too busy to cook for your family, don’t volunteer to bake for the bake-sale.  If you don’t have enough money to buy your kid’s school supplies, don’t go out with friends to dinner and or a bar.
  17. Pack your lunch and prepare your breakfast the night before.  This way there is no rush and no temptation to hit the fast food place on the way to where you are going.
  18. Tidy up before bed.  Make sure the dishes are done, items are put away.  When you take care of things as they arise, the job is not near as daunting.
  19. Now here is the big one:  REST.  Yes, REST.  Take some time to unwind, read a calming book or an evening devotion.  UNPLUG, do not pick up that phone or tablet before bed, it stimulates the brain.
  20. Go to bed “early”.  We try to be in bed between 9 and 9:30 pm each night, this means we easily obtain 7-8 hours of good sleep before we start all over again.  A good night’s sleep is important for your body to refuel and repair.  It’s directly tied into your mood, weight, stress levels and energy.  Get some good rest.

I know this really sounds like a lot, but it all falls into place easily.  I’ll be writing more about bullet journals in the future, but keeping these are a wonderful way to stay organized.  It also helps me to remember what I did several days back.

Enjoy, and until next time.

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

Dill Pickles

It’s now the end of July and the garden is in full force!  Especially the cucumbers, okra, eggplant and squash.

Every pantry should have some pickles tucked away as special treat.  Here is my favorite dill pickle brine recipe.  This is a very versatile recipe that can be used with beans (dilly beans), okra, squash, eggplant and especially cucumbers, just replace the cucumber spears with beans, okra or squash.

Ingredients (Makes 8 pints):

  • 4 pounds of pickling cucmbers
  • 8 heads of fresh dill
  • 8 cleaned cloves of garlic
  • 1/2 cup of pickling salt
  • 4 cups of apple cider vinegar (canning grade)
  • 4 cups of water
  • 1 tablespoon mustard seeds
  • 1 tsp red pepper flakes (optional)

Directions:

  1. Prepare your pint jars for canning (wash/sterilize).
  2. Prepare your water bath canner.
  3. Slice your cucumbers into spears that fit into pint jars leaving 1/2 inch head-space.
    1. For Okra, slice off the stems, leave the caps, and slice off the tip of the bottom.
    2. For dilly beans, remove the top stem area and the tip at the bottom.
    3. For squash slice like you would cucumbers.
    4. For eggplant, slice into rounds or into strips, skin on.
  4. Pack each jar tightly.
  5. Add one clove of garlic and one head of dill in each jar.
  6. Add in your red pepper flakes if you choose to have spicy.
  7. In a large pot combine your vinegar, water, mustard seeds and salt and bring to a boil.
  8. Pour hot liquid into each jar, leaving 1/2 inch head-space.
  9. Clean the mouth of each jar, placing on the lids and rings.  Make sure your rings are tight, but not like Hercules tight.
  10. Place in your water bath canner and process for 10 minutes AFTER your water bath canner reaches a full boil.  (Please refer to your canner’s directions for best results).
  11. Remove and cool, they will POP when sealed.
  12. It’s best to leave sitting for 12-24 hours before moving into storage.
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Dill pickles

Enjoy!

Until Next Time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

 

 

 

Cherry Chipotle Pepper Chicken

One of my favorite fruit choices is Black Cherries.  The ultimate sweet treat in the early summer months.  I love them raw, in desserts, over yogurt and cottage cheese, in jams and with chicken.  Wait! What?  Yes, you read that correctly, fruit goes extremely well with meat and cherries really take on a whole new flavor mixed with the smokiness of the chipotle pepper (a smoked jalapeno pepper) and chicken.

I’ve taken this dish to many pot-lucks and served as meals for friends and it always gets rave reviews.  I hope you like it!

Cherry Chipotle Pepper Chicken

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds of chicken breasts or mixed chicken meat.
  • One pound of ripe black cherries, pitted and sliced.
  • 1 cup of French salad dressing (yup you read that right)
  • 4 fresh cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 packet of dried French onion soup mix (however, I choose to make my own using a bouillon cube of the type of meat I’m using, boiled with a small onion)
  • In true Rice Household fashion 1/2 teaspoon of dried Chipotle Pepper Flakes

Directions:

  1. Dice your chicken into large chunks.
  2. Spray your crock pot with a no stick spray, or grease with your choice of grease.  I use a casserole style crock pot for this recipe.
  3. Scatter your chicken in the crock-pot.
  4. Add in your garlic and your french onion soup mix.
  5. Add in your french salad dressing and stir ingredients together.
  6. Add in your chipotle pepper flakes and stir in.
  7. Now add in your cherries.  If you are using canned (I can mine when they are in season), do not use the juice, only the fruit.  Save the juice to enjoy later.
  8. Mix the cherries through the mix.
  9. Place the lid on your crock-pot.  Turn on low or medium depending on the way your crock-pot heats (mine runs hot).
  10. Cook for 5 – 6 hours in the crock pot or until the meat is completely done.
  11. Serve over rice.

Enjoy!

Until Next Time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

 

Sour Dough Biscuits

I nearly always have sour dough starter fermenting in our kitchen. It adds up quickly. A great way to use the starter without baking bread is to make biscuits.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup of real butter softened
  • 2 tsp Baking Powder
  • 1/2 tsp Baking Soda
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 cup sour dough starter

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 425 F
  • Line your cookie sheet with parchment paper. This helps prevent burning on the bottom.
  • Mix all ingredients together until well mixed.
  • Sprinkle some flour on your board.
  • Roll slightly with a rolling pin. You don’t want thin biscuits.
  • Cut circles with a round cookie or biscuit cutter. I prefer to use a canning ring.
  • Place on parchment papered pan.
  • Bake for 15 min
  • Serve hot or cooled.

Makes 4 large or 7 small biscuits.

Enjoy and until next time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

Sweet Summer Squash Pickles

The one thing about yellow crook neck (summer squash) is it’s either feast or famine! I intentionally planted 8 plants in our garden this year. We love this beautiful golden squash all sizes and prepares many ways. My favorite, and our grandson’s favorite, is sweet summer squash pickles. This is a recipe that uses water bath canning for storage.

Sweet Summer Squash Pickles

Ingredients:

  • 8 cups of summer squash sliced thin, not paper thin. Smaller sizes are best, larger circles can be quartered or halved.
  • 2 cups sweet onion, sliced thin,rings or half rings.
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 4 green peppers, small. Diced into small cubes, no seeds please.
  • 3 cups sugar
  • 2 cups canning grade Apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tsp mustard seed
  • 2 tsp celery seed.

Directions:

  1. Place sliced squash and sliced onion in a large bowl.
  2. Mix well with salt (to pull out moisture)
  3. Set squash aside for 30 min to an hour.
  4. Prepare in a large boil pot add your remaining ingredients: vinegar, sugar, peppers, celery seed, mustard seed.
  5. Bring to a rolling boil while stiring. Remove from heat.
  6. Transfer your squash mix into a large draining bowel to drain off pulled out moisture. Do not rinse.
  7. Add squash onion mix into the hot brine mix and stir in for about 5 min.
  8. Transfer into sterilized prepared jars for canning.
  9. Water bath can for 10 min at high boil. (Follow water bath instructions).
  10. Remove and cool.

After the joyous pops of sealed jars I do my best to not open for at least 2 weeks. I TRY anyway.

Enjoy!

Until next time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice