Beef Tongue Stroganoff

Yes, you read that correctly. Beef Tongue. Beef Tongue is an excellent cut of beef, despite what you may think. It is however, very high in fat, so have sparingly. Most people have heard of Beef Tongue Sandwiches which are made from an almost “pickled” version of beef tongue and are sliced and served cold. I love these too, my best friend’s grandma used to make the absolute best Beef Tongue sandwiches.

However, my husband’s very favorite recipe is one my Grandmama taught me to make. Beef Tongue Stroganoff. When you slow cook (I use a crock-pot) beef tongue it becomes such a soft and wonderful shredded beef, only to be compared to beef cheek meat. My husband refers to it as “beef butter”.

I do hope you enjoy this recipe.

Ingredients and utensils needed:

  • 1 Beef Tongue (washed, do not skin)
  • 3 bay leaves
  • A pinch of salt
  • tsp of chipotle pepper flakes (you expected that by now right?)
  • 1 lb of fresh mushrooms
  • 1 large onion sliced in half rings
  • 2 cups of Greek plain yogurt (or sour cream, I use yogurt to cut down on fat)
  • 3 – 4 cloves of garlic diced
  • 1 tbsp of cornstarch
  • 1 large crock-pot
  • a thick butcher grade knife

Directions:

  1. Wash your beef tongue. I know there is probably a joke here, but we won’t go there.
  2. Rub & coat with a pinch of salt & corn starch and place in the crock-pot. Place about 3 tablespoons of water in the crock-pot.
  3. Sprinkle the chipotle pepper flakes over the tongue.
  4. Put your bay leaves over the tongue.
  5. Set the temperature to Medium and let cook all day. Yes, ALL DAY.
  6. At the end of the day, remove from the crock pot and let cool on a cutting board.
  7. Skin the tongue. I slice down the middle just enough to cut through the outer skin, and pull the skin back.
  8. The tip of the tongue has it’s own “texture”. Personally its the prize for me and I keep it separate to enjoy on a piece of toast.
  9. TAKE OUT THE BAY LEAVES. My husband ALWAYS ends up with a piece of Bay Leaf. Make sure you get all the pieces out.
  10. Shred the meat of the tongue and place back in the crock-pot.
  11. In a frying pan, saute your onions, garlic until the onions are “limp”.
  12. Add in your mushrooms and saute until they are cooked but still firm.
  13. Pour over your meat in the crock-pot.
  14. Set the crock-pot temperature to warm.
  15. Add in your Greek Yogurt (sour cream) and stir together with all of the other ingredients.
  16. You should not have to add any moisture, but if you do, only add 1 tablespoon of water at a time. Remember the tongue is full of fat and should have created a nice thick broth while cooking.
  17. Stir off and on while you prepare your noodles, rice or potatoes that you will be serving with your stroganoff.
  18. Keep a watchful eye on your crock pot and stir often. This will prevent any clumping or “curdling” of the yogurt/sour cream.
  19. Serve over noodles, rice or potatoes and enjoy!

I hope you enjoy this very basic recipe. It also heats up great for left overs!

Until Next Time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

 

The Art Of Bartering

You rarely hear of this old traditional way of ‘business’ anymore. Mostly you hear about cost and income. Bartering has been around longer than any other form of exchange for goods. You have something I need/want, I have something you need/want. We trade in an honest transaction of similar value.

I got a serious case of the giggles the other night as husband and I were watching old Andy Griffith Mayberry RFD reruns as I was drafting this blog, and it was one of my favorite episodes. I’m sure you remember the one. The Mayor is eyeing Andy’s fishing pole because it “always catches fish” and the mayor can’t catch a fish to save his life until he uses Andy’s fishing pole. Later on in the show, Andy trades his fishing pole for a gift for Aunt Bee, but when the Mayor needs Andy to vouch for him, Andy gets his fishing pole back as trade for vouching for the Mayor. I know, I know, in a way its more of a “I’ll scratch your back, you scratch mine”, but it still made me laugh because of the timing.

Anyway, back to bartering. Bartering can help your budget tremendously when done correctly. Can I sell these goods I’m trading for more money? Probably, but, what is the gain. For example, you have a farmer friend who has no market for beef organ meat and you have a surplus of relishes and pickled items. They like pickles and pickled okra, you like beef liver. A trade of a few pints of pickles and you have dinner. Also, giving time, to be “paid” in goods is more than acceptable but never thought of anymore either.

Clean stalls for a day, get sent home with ground lamb or beef soup bones. I’d say that’s a win, win for both. The sad thing is that in this money driven world, many people don’t look at the good in bartering. It doesn’t need to just be for food either, it can be a fair trade for say, materials for a hobby, or other such goods. Many times, I’ll trade jams for a basket of canning jars, or eggs for a tote of fabric scraps.

It also helps with reusing items. Someone may be cleaning out a garage and find all types of things you may need. The old adage of “One man’s trash is another man’s treasure” is more than true. Even more so in today’s world if you think about it, due to the throw away society we have been surrounded with.

A fun day can be gathering your friends for a “swap meet day”. We’ve done this before with clothes. Maternity clothes, business clothes, kids clothes, etc. Trading and reusing, re homing etc. I love getting second hand clothes that I can make into other clothes, such as jeans into jean skirts or overalls into adorable jumpers. I love to sew, I see treasures in all kinds of means of fabric.

The next time you want or need an item, think about an honest trade, barter or swap. It’s also a great way to get to know your neighbor, people, local farmers.

Until Next Time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice.

Traditional Chevron Baby Blanket

In my opinion one of the simplest beginner crochet blankets is the Traditional Chevron Pattern.

My Momma states that its her favorite because she doesn’t need a pattern, she can just take off and do it. By mixing up the colors, stripe widths and all kinds of fun variations, no 2 blankets have to look alike.

Download instructions:

My favorite is a stripe color variation of:

  • Base row color: 20 rows
  • Second row color: 10 rows
  • Third row color 5 rows:
  • Fourth row, second color 10 rows
  • Fifth row first color 20 rows.

Then you would continue on for the length of your blanket ending with your base row and base color. From here you can leave the pointed ends (the most common) or border them off solid by adding single crochet stitches until they even out.

Here is the basic instructions:

What you will need for a baby blanket:

  • H size crochet hook
  • 4 skeins of yarn (Redheart brand is my favorite) I size it out as 2 of my largest amount then 1 each of my other colors. This is by preference.

Abbreviations:

  • SC = Single Crochet
  • C = Chain
  • SK = Skip stitch

Instructions:

  • c 151 (For a baby blanket/crib size)
  • SK 1 chain from hook, *SC in next 11 stitches, 3 SC in the next chain, 1 SC in the next 11 stitches, SK 2 stitches. * Repeat from * until the last SK 2 stitches. Here you need to SK 1, 1 SC, CH 1 and turn.
  • Repeat for (20) rows with color #1 or until you want to change colors.
  • Repeat for (10) rows with color #2 or until you want to change colors.
  • Repeat for (5) rows with color #3 or until you want to change colors.
  • Repeat for (10) rows with color #2 or until you want to change colors.
  • Repeat for (20) rows with color #1 or until you want to change colors.
  • Repeat until you have your desired length.

If you want to fill in the triangles at the bottom/top and square off with a boarder, here is how you do that:

To square off with a boarder:

  • Start at the right edge of your blanket. SC in each stitch to the inside corner.
  • Slip-Stitch to join the left edge.
  • SC along the row you just made to the second to the last stitch, SK 1, SC 1, then CH 1 and turn.
  • SK 1 stitch, then SC into 2nd stitch and continue to SC to the end of the row.
  • Slip Stitch into the left side of the new row.
  • Continue this until the triangle space is filled.
  • Once your triangles are “filled” you can continue with creating the boarder of your blanket in any pattern you like.

I have many of my blankets and items for sale, please check out my ETSY site:

  1. https://www.etsy.com/shop/GrandmaKaysCreations

I hope you enjoy. Until next time,

Mrs. Kay Rice