Spiced Ham (Spam)

spamSandwich spread, spiced ham, ham loaf, Spam.  It has many names.  I’m sure as soon as you read “spam” you either thought “Yes!” or you may have thrown up a little.  I will tell you that homemade “spam” is nothing like today’s cheap meat in a can Spam.   Depending on the spices you use in making it, it can be different every time you make it as well.

You can also “can” this wonderful concoction and make it into a sandwich “spread”, but it will cook in the jar, as does any meat.

So, here we go:

Ingredients:

  • 1½ pounds fatty pork shoulder, cubed
  • ¼ pound skinless pork belly, cubed
  • ¼ pound ham, cubed
  • 1½ teaspoons pickling salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1/8 teaspoon dried jalapeno powder (we like spice)
  • 1½ teaspoons sugar
  • ½ teaspoon  garlic diced
  • ½ teaspoon dehydrated onion flake (or dehydrated ramp flakes)
  • ½ cup ice water

Directions:

  1. To make the grinding easier, place the pork, spread out in the freezer on a tray until well chilled.  Not frozen, just well chilled.  You are working with RAW PORK, PLEASE USE PROPER FOOD PRECAUTIONS, KEEP YOUR MEAT SEPARATED AND AWAY FROM OTHER FOOD.
  2. Once everything is chilled, process the pork in sections in a food processor, once  each one achieves the texture you desire add to a large bowl. I like my ham a little bigger pieces then the pork and pork belly.
  3. Now add all your meat together and mix with a mixer with the spices.
  4. Slowly add in the ice water to the meat and spices.  You want to mix this until it is emulsified well.  Meat paste.  (I do realize that sounds gross….)

NON CANNING METHOD:

  • Transfer into a greased small loaf pans; smooth top with a greased rubber spatula. Cover tightly with aluminum foil and place in a larger pan with 2-inch tall sides. Fill the larger pan with hot water halfway up the sides of the loaf pan. Bake in a preheated 300°F oven for 1½ hours. Let cool completely before removing from pan. Cut into thick slices and serve cold or shallow fried until crusty.

CANNING METHOD:

  • Requires a pressure caner.  Make sure you understand completely how to pressure can meat before doing this method!
  • Prepare your WIDE MOUTH Pint Jars as you would for normal meat preserving.
  • Make sure your meat mixture has NOTHING FROZEN LEFT IN IT!!!! NEVER can anything that is frozen or overly cold!
  • Pack your meat mixture into your jars leaving 1 1/2 inch head space.
  • Do not add any additional moisture.
  • Clean the edges of your jars, place your lids and rings (tightly but not like Samson tightly)
  • Place in your pressure caner and FOLLOW YOUR CANER’S DIRECTIONS!
  • Meat MUST pressure can for 75 minutes for pints once it reaches the canning stage.
  • Let your caner de-pressurize, and once you remove your jars, you will need to leave sitting for at least 24 hours.  Make sure they seal.
  • Place on your pantry shelf and you have processed spam as a quick grab.

NOTE:  The canning method COOKS the meat in the jar, so it is the shape of the jar.  Using the Wide Mouth jars allows you to “slide” it out of the jar and slice the spam and then fry or use as a spread, its already cooked!

It may seem like a lot of work, but the flavor is so much better than anything that is mass produced!  You will never eat store bought again!

Until Next Time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

 

 

 

Strawberry Rhubarb Jam

Strawberry Rhubarb JamOne of my favorite jam is Strawberry Rhubarb.  It just screams summer.  A little on a hot buttered sour dough biscuit is heaven!

Here is my recipe for a very simple, basic Strawberry Rhubarb Jam.

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups of fresh rhubarb, diced.  Make sure it is blushed (it has some red/pink color)
  • 4 cups of fresh strawberries diced (remove the caps)
  • 4 cups of sugar
  • 1.75 ounces of low sugar pectin
  • 2 tablespoons of lemon juice

Directions:

  1. Make sure your rhubarb is diced small, add to a large pot.
  2. Cap and dice your strawberries, add to the same large pot.
  3. Add in your lemon juice and heat the mixture until the fruit becomes soft.
  4. Mix your sugar and pectin to in a bowl, then add the mixture to your fruit 1 cup at a time.  Constantly mixing until all the sugar and pectin is in the fruit.
  5. Move your heat to high, constantly stirring.
  6. You can use a candy thermometer if you like, your key temperature is 200.  But you can also just use your eyes
  7. When it reaches a rolling boil and starts to foam, add in a quick pat of real butter (DO NOT USE FAKE BUTTER, YUCKY!!!!)  The butter tones down the foam.
  8. Keep on a high rolling boil and stir constantly for approximately 3 minutes.
  9. Take off the heat.
  10. Now I do a freezer test.  I have a small glass cup and a metal spoon and I put a wee bit of jam on the spoon and stick it in the freezer to fast cool.   Once the cup is cool, your jam should be the consistency it will be when it is “set”.  I’m picky with Strawberry Rhubarb, I don’t like a hard set or even a medium set I like it to spread like warm butter.  But if you want a firmer set than what you have, put back on the heat and bring to a full boil again for another 2 min.  repeat test until you have received the firmness you like.

Preserving:

This recipe makes about 8 half-pints of jam.

  1. Have your jars sterilized and ready to go with their lids and rings ready.  (I’m assuming you’ve water bath canned before here….)
  2. Fill your jars up to about 1/2 inch from the top with hot jam.
  3. Wipe the lips of your jars with a wet cloth to make sure you don’t have anything on the tops where the lids need to seal.
  4. Place your prepared lids on the jars, and sorta tightly screw on your rings.
  5. Place in your water bath or steam canner.
  6. Once your canner comes to a full boil, start timing at 15 minutes.
  7. After 15 min, remove canner from heat.
  8. CAREFULLY!!!!!!! Remove your lid and once by one remove your jars.
  9. Place your jars on a protective covering (I use a double towel) in an area that you do not need to bother the jars for 24 hours.
  10. When you hear the “pops” they are sealed.  If you have a jar that did not seal, put it in the fridge, it will be gone quickly.

Strawberry Rhubarb Jam

Now all there is to do is enjoy the sweet gift of summer!!!!!

Until next time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

 

Tomato Powder

One of the most basic garden vegetables are tomatoes, cherry or normal size.  Its how many people get hooked on growing their own food.  One reason is because they are so prolific and easy to grow.  Note, Prolific!  Cherry, grape, salad tomatoes especially will create a ton of tomatoes during a season.  While in February as you long for the taste of a fresh, real, non-store bought tomato, by September you never want to eat one again.  Yet, they still continue to cover your plants!  What to do with all of them.

Unless you pickle the cherry tomatoes, you will have to find many friends to pawn them off on, they are too much trouble to can, in my opinion.  If you have larger tomatoes and don’t can, you will be in this same boat.  I don’t like to freeze tomatoes, they take up too much room and it is a messy processes.  What I like to do is dehydrate them and turn them into powder.  Yes, you read that right.

Powdered tomatoes are perfect for a vegetable thickener in sauce and pasta dishes as well as a base vegetable bullion for soups and stews.  The best thing is that 5 pounds of tomatoes can fit into a half-pint jar!  Space!  I really like this for my cherry tomatoes because the prep goes so fast, they add up fast and nothing is left to waste.

Here are the directions.

Tomato Powder

  1. Wash your tomatoes.
  2. Cut out any blemishes and stem area.
  3. Slice thin and place on your dehydrator rack (or on a cookie sheet with parchment paper if you are going to use your oven).
  4. Make sure they are not overlapping.  Tomatoes contain a lot of water.
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  6. I place my dehydrator on medium heat and this takes about 7 hours.  If you are using your oven, use the lowest heat and crack the door open to dry your slices.
  7. Dry until they are completely crispy with NO MOISTURE.
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  9. You can leave in this state if you want to vacuum seal at this stage and use like sun dried tomatoes as well.  I have one friend that will use vinegar and oil and put the in the refrigerator to use in salads.  I prefer not to utilize refrigerator space in that way.  This state also makes a wonderful sun dried tomato salad dressing.
  10. Place your ‘chips’ in a grinder and grind until a powder.
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  12. You can also add dehydrated garlic, onion, peppers, pretty much anything you want at this stage and grind all together to make sure its well mixed.  This would make a lovely stock base.
  13. Next transfer into an airtight container that is resistant to air and to moisture.  I prefer to vac-seal my jars with the exception of one that I will use often and that one will be put in my spice cabinet.
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This powder has so many uses.  My favorite way is to add a little tomato flavor and a thickener to dishes without all the water  content.  It works great as an alternative to a small amount of tomato paste as well.

Let me know how this turned out for you!

Enjoy!

Until Next Time,

Mrs. Kay L. Rice

 

Okra

It has been a hot, rainy, humid summer here in Ohio.  The garden has loved it, but the one plant that has truly loved this year’s weather is our OKRA!  I grew up loving this vegetable which is widely used in the southern states, my family is very southern.  Waves at my Great Aunt Meg, who REALLY taught me to enjoy southern cooking back in Mentor, Tennessee!

I planted two varieties this year, one the shorter ruby and the other is the heirloom green, which by the way, grows taller than me.  Its a good thing my husband and I both LOVE, and that is an understatement, okra.  Because this year, I have harvested baskets of it and every day it seems that I have a new big basket to harvest every afternoon.  Yes, I am still harvesting well into September!  Okay so I may have planted 100 plants, but well, we love okra.

Now, what do you do with this odd, spiny, plant that when cooked creates what I call “Okra Boogers” or “Okra Snot” depending on who you want to shock and gross out at the time.  My husband refers to the okra peas as “rat eyes” especially in soups and stews.  Can you tell that we just love to have fun!  Oh, here is a warning.  Some people are very allergic to the fuzz that grows on okra, it causes almost a poison ivy affect to their skin.  I’ve never had this problem, but I do know some who do.

Okra is highly nutritious and it is filling as well as easy to grow in warm temperatures, which explains why you find it a lot in the southern states.  It’s very high in fiber as well as containing potassium, vitamin B, vitamin C, folic acid, and calcium. It’s low in calories and has a high dietary fiber content. Recently, a new benefit of including okra in your diet is being considered. Okra has been suggested to help manage blood sugar in cases of type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes.  So in short, what’s not to like.

My husband’s absolute favorite for okra, is pickled okra.

Pickled Okra

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 lb of okra
  • 1/4 clove of garlic for each jar (6)
  • 1 dill flower head for each jar (6)
  • jalapeno pepper diced fine or red pepper flakes
  • 3 cups of apple cider vinager
  • 3 cups of water
  • 1/4 cup pickling salt
  • 1 tablespoon of mustard seed
  • 6 half pint canning glass jars with lids and rings

Directions

  1. Clean your okra removing the tips and caps only (I keep some of the cap on).  Leave whole.
  2. Add 1/4 clove garlic in each jar.
  3. Add 1 dill flower in each jar.
  4. Pack your okra tightly in each jar leaving 1/2 inches head space.
  5. In a large pot on your stove.  Combine your Vinegar, water, salt, peppers, mustard seeds.
  6. Stir and bring to a full boil.  Do not stop stirring, your salt will burn.
  7. Ladle liquid into jars, leaving 1/2 inch head-space.
  8. Water bath process for 15 minutes half pints 20 minutes for pints.

 

Another way we like them is pan fried as a side dish.

Pan Fried Okra

  1.  Melt about a tablespoon of lard in a frying pan.
  2. In a bowl I whip up 1 egg and set to the side.
  3. I prepare the okra by taking off the tips and caps and slicing into thick rounds.
  4. I put all the okra into the egg batter and stir in some red pepper flakes, or some diced jalapeno.
  5. Next I add enough cornmeal to the egg and okra and stir it in the bowl to cover it all, you don’t want it corn patty thick, but just enough to give a nice coating.
  6. Once the lard is melted, add your mixture into the pan and “separate” the pieces and move around often in the hot lard to cook.
  7. You will want to watch it because it will cook fast and is easily burned.
  8. Serve hot or cold.

All this is fine and well until you realize you are becoming over run with okra, so how do you store it to enjoy later and in the winter when it is no longer in season?  In addition to the pickling, we also store two other ways.  Freezing and dehydrating.

Dehydrating your Okra

I like to dehydrate our okra because it takes up very little space, it gets rid of the “Okra Boogers” and it works fantastic for gumbos, soups and stews.

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  1. Wash your okra and remove the caps and tips.
  2. I flash steam my okra whole.
  3. Slice into rounds or wedges.  I like the wedges because they don’t shrink to itty-bitty pieces.
  4. Place in your dehydrator on low heat/vegetable heat and run until they are crispy and no sign of moisture.  You can also do this in the oven on the lowest temperature, door cracked upon, placing the okra on a cookie sheet with parchment paper.
  5. Vac-Seal or store in an air-tight/moisture resistance container.

The final way is to freeze the okra.  I try not to do this because I don’t like to fill up the freezer with vegetables that can be stored other ways, but I will freeze some.  You can use this as fried okra, or in soups, stews and gumbos when you need it in the off season.

Freeze Store Okra

Warning you will be dealing with lots of “Okra Boogers” in this process.

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  1. Clean your okra, remove the tips and caps.
  2. Bring a pot of water to a full boil and turn off the water.
  3. Dunk your okra (whole) in the hot water for about 3 minutes.  This is a quick blanch.
  4. Dump the hot water out from around the hot okra and now fill the pot with ice cubes.  This prevents the okra from continuing to cook from the blanching process.
  5. Now take out each okra spear and cut into rounds.
  6. For large and woody spears of okra, discard the green pod and keep the okra peas (the white seeds), these are great in soups.  These are what my loving husband refers to as “Rat Eyes”.
  7. Once your spears are cut into rounds, put them in your vacuum seal bags and seal.  Make sure all air is out of the bag, then freeze.  I usually store in 2 cup quantities which is about a serving.

I hope you have enjoyed this post about all things Okra!  Feel free to share your recipes and questions.

Until Next Time,

Mrs. Kay L. Rice

 

 

 

Sweet Heat Pickle Relish

I love a good pickle relish, especially on grilled bratwurst, but my favorite is to use in ham salad, egg salad, macaroni salad, you get the picture.  Of course, it wouldn’t be from the Rice Household without a little spark of heat.

Here is my recipe for my Sweet Heat Pickle Relish.

Ingredients:  (Makes about 8 half-pints of relish)

  • 4 cups of finely chopped cucumbers (skin on)
  • 2 cups of finely chopped onions
  • 1 green pepper finely chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper finely chopped (or 2 green if you don’t want a red one)
  • 2 jalapeno peppers finely chopped (remove the seeds and membranes for less heat)  *Use Latex gloves when working with any hot pepper.
  • 1/4 cup of pickling salt
  • 2 cups of cider vinegar (canning grade)
  • 3 cups of sugar
  • 1 tsp. celery seed
  • 1 tablespoon of mustard seed

Directions:

  1. I use my Ninja processor to finely chop my items.
  2. Combine the cucumbers, onion and peppers in a very large bowl.
  3. Sprinkle with the pickling salt and toss well (please put on latex gloves to avoid burning your face and eyes).
  4. Cover with ice and cold water and set to the side.
  5. Let the mixture stand for 2 hours minimum but no longer than 6 hours.
  6. Drain well, pressing out the excess water.
  7. Combine your cider vinegar, sugar, celery seed and mustard seed in a kettle.
  8. Bring liquid to a boil to dissolve the sugar.  It is important you stir while heating so the sugar doesn’t burn on the bottom of your kettle.
  9. Add your chopped items to the liquid and simmer for approximately 10 minutes.
  10. Pack into prepared and sterilized half pint (or quarter pint) jars, leaving a half inch head space.
  11. Water bath process for 15 minutes.
  12. Remove from your water bath canner to a place where they can seal.
  13. The pop will confirm your jars have sealed.
  14. Leave alone to settle for 12-24 hours before putting them in your pantry.

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Sweet Heat Pickle Relish

I hope you enjoy this wonderful condiment!

Until Next Time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

 

 

Dill Pickles

It’s now the end of July and the garden is in full force!  Especially the cucumbers, okra, eggplant and squash.

Every pantry should have some pickles tucked away as special treat.  Here is my favorite dill pickle brine recipe.  This is a very versatile recipe that can be used with beans (dilly beans), okra, squash, eggplant and especially cucumbers, just replace the cucumber spears with beans, okra or squash.

Ingredients (Makes 8 pints):

  • 4 pounds of pickling cucmbers
  • 8 heads of fresh dill
  • 8 cleaned cloves of garlic
  • 1/2 cup of pickling salt
  • 4 cups of apple cider vinegar (canning grade)
  • 4 cups of water
  • 1 tablespoon mustard seeds
  • 1 tsp red pepper flakes (optional)

Directions:

  1. Prepare your pint jars for canning (wash/sterilize).
  2. Prepare your water bath canner.
  3. Slice your cucumbers into spears that fit into pint jars leaving 1/2 inch head-space.
    1. For Okra, slice off the stems, leave the caps, and slice off the tip of the bottom.
    2. For dilly beans, remove the top stem area and the tip at the bottom.
    3. For squash slice like you would cucumbers.
    4. For eggplant, slice into rounds or into strips, skin on.
  4. Pack each jar tightly.
  5. Add one clove of garlic and one head of dill in each jar.
  6. Add in your red pepper flakes if you choose to have spicy.
  7. In a large pot combine your vinegar, water, mustard seeds and salt and bring to a boil.
  8. Pour hot liquid into each jar, leaving 1/2 inch head-space.
  9. Clean the mouth of each jar, placing on the lids and rings.  Make sure your rings are tight, but not like Hercules tight.
  10. Place in your water bath canner and process for 10 minutes AFTER your water bath canner reaches a full boil.  (Please refer to your canner’s directions for best results).
  11. Remove and cool, they will POP when sealed.
  12. It’s best to leave sitting for 12-24 hours before moving into storage.
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Dill pickles

Enjoy!

Until Next Time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

 

 

 

Sweet Summer Squash Pickles

The one thing about yellow crook neck (summer squash) is it’s either feast or famine! I intentionally planted 8 plants in our garden this year. We love this beautiful golden squash all sizes and prepares many ways. My favorite, and our grandson’s favorite, is sweet summer squash pickles. This is a recipe that uses water bath canning for storage.

Sweet Summer Squash Pickles

Ingredients:

  • 8 cups of summer squash sliced thin, not paper thin. Smaller sizes are best, larger circles can be quartered or halved.
  • 2 cups sweet onion, sliced thin,rings or half rings.
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 4 green peppers, small. Diced into small cubes, no seeds please.
  • 3 cups sugar
  • 2 cups canning grade Apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tsp mustard seed
  • 2 tsp celery seed.

Directions:

  1. Place sliced squash and sliced onion in a large bowl.
  2. Mix well with salt (to pull out moisture)
  3. Set squash aside for 30 min to an hour.
  4. Prepare in a large boil pot add your remaining ingredients: vinegar, sugar, peppers, celery seed, mustard seed.
  5. Bring to a rolling boil while stiring. Remove from heat.
  6. Transfer your squash mix into a large draining bowel to drain off pulled out moisture. Do not rinse.
  7. Add squash onion mix into the hot brine mix and stir in for about 5 min.
  8. Transfer into sterilized prepared jars for canning.
  9. Water bath can for 10 min at high boil. (Follow water bath instructions).
  10. Remove and cool.

After the joyous pops of sealed jars I do my best to not open for at least 2 weeks. I TRY anyway.

Enjoy!

Until next time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

Preserving Wild Ramps

Wild Ramps, also referred to as Wild Leeks, are an amazing spring treat that grows in the wooded areas around the same time that morals (mushrooms) and Pheasant Back Mushrooms start to peek out.  April to the end of May these wonderful natural treats cover select patches of wooded areas.  They originally were gathered and enjoyed in the Appalachia Areas (that I know of).   Ramps taste like sweet garlic.  Some people say they taste like green onion, but to me they are more garlic.

This year my husband and I went foraging and were blessed with an abundance of Ramps and some Pheasant Back mushrooms.

Since I work in the city all week, I long for my evenings and weekends in the country.  I love coming home to simplicity, and it doesn’t get much more simple than this.  Enjoying the gifts strait from God.  The wonderful afternoon hike proved to be more than just good for my soul, but it provided a bountiful addition to our pantry.

We love both of these items fresh, but honestly their natural shelf life is not very long.  So what to do with all the wonderful goodies, without over eating or worse, wasting them?

My favorite recipe this year is Pickled Ramps.  A very good friend of mine from church sent me a link for a recipe she uses for her pickled radishes.  I’ve tweaked it a tad to include water bath canning time and preferred taste:

Recipe 1:  Spicy Pickled Ramps  (Makes 2 pints)

Preparation:  Clean your ramps.  Wash thoroughly, peel away the outer layer, cut off the roots and just below the leaves.  (Keep your leaves separated for the next recipe)

 

Once you have your ramps ready, pack them tightly in clean and sterilized Pint Canning jars.  I pack mine to where there is a layer bulb down and a layer bulb up so that they are nice and tight but not squished.

In EACH Pint Jar Add 1/2 teaspoon of red pepper flakes and 1/2 teaspoon of whole mustard seed.

Set the jars two the side, while your water bath canner is heating up.

Off to the side on another stove burner in a Simmering Pot Add:

  • 3/4 cups of Apple Cider Vinegar (canning grade)
  • 3/4 cups of Water
  • 2 teaspoons of canning salt
  • 3 tablespoons of raw honey

Heat your liquid mixture, constantly stirring until it is boiling.  Make sure you don’t stop stirring so your honey doesn’t scorch.

Pour your liquid over your ramps in your jars until the ramps are covered (1/2 inch head space for the jar).

Wipe down your jar rims from any splash.

Place your lids on the jars and tightly (but not like Hercules tightly) put on your rims.

Place the jars one by one in your water bath canner.  Water should be one inch over your jars after all jars are loaded into your canner.

Once your canner comes to a boil, you will want it to remain boiling for 20 minutes.

At the sound of the timer, the end of twenty minutes, I turn off the heat to the canner and let it sit until the boil is gone.  Then using canning tongs I take my jars out and put them on a clean covered area where they can cool for the next 12 hours.  Each sealed jar will give you that wonderful “POP”.  Let cool for 12 hours and put away in the pantry.

These are best if you can wait 5 days before opening, however, we opened one jar 24 hours after it was canned, we couldn’t stand it any longer, and it was absolutely heavenly.

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Refrigerate after you break the seal.

Recipe #2: Dehydrated Ramps

Remember when I said, don’t throw away those leaves?  Well here is why, they make yummy soup & stew & Stock greens.  Using your dehydrator (or oven on the lowest temperature), spread your leaves out and dry, then crumble up.

For the bulbs, we slice thin and put in the dehydrator at 100 degrees for overnight (or until they crumble).  Dehydrated ramp bulbs are so yummy to just eat like chips if you like garlic, which we do.  They are also perfect for dried goods for your pantry to be used anywhere you would use leeks, garlic or green onion.

We have a Vac-u-Sealer with a lid attachment, so we put our dehydrated goods in a canning jar, then using the lid attachment vac-seal the jar.  This is a great way to store without crushing your dehydrated goods.  NOTE:  You must use a clean jar and a clean canning lid each time you seal the jar.  You can not reuse lids.20180508_200148742386972.jpg

We also cleaned, diced and stored our Pheasant Back mushrooms this way with the dehydrator and the vac-u-sealer with the lid attachment.  The centers will be used for stew and soup stock while the tender outer areas will be used for pretty much anything.

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I really hope you enjoy this recipe and ideas to use what you have and venture out into nature to enjoy the beauty and bounty provided there.

But remember this, don’t take more than YOU can use.  Don’t be greedy.  Use a netted bag when collecting mushrooms (that way the spores will fall to the ground and make more next year).  Leave plenty for the animals and nature.  Oh and if you don’t know for sure if something is not edible, don’t eat it.  😉

Until next time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

 

 

 

Alphabet Soup Mix in a Jar

Meal-Prepping and filling your pantry doesn’t have to be a daunting task.  Utilizing dehydrated veggies and herbs works great to have a quick grab and prepared home cooked meal.  These also have a great shelf life to have on hand during emergency and disaster situations.

Today I am sharing a fun kid friendly recipe.  Alphabet Soup.  And it tastes so much better than store bought condensed.

First to prepare your jars.

  • 1 half pint canning jar with a tight lid.
  • 1 cup alphabet pasta
  • 2 tablespoons dried vegetable flakes
  • 1 teaspoon chicken bouillon granuals or powder
  • 1/8 tsp black pepper

Directions for jars.

  1. Make sure your jar and lids are clean and dry!
  2. Layer 1/2 cup of pasta, then 1 tablespoon of dehydrated veggies, then the boullion and Pepper.
  3. Layer the second tablespoon of veggies then the second half cup of pasta.
  4. The layering just makes it “pretty”.
  5. Tightly screw on your lid and label.
  6. Alphabet Soup Mix
  7. Add 4 cups water + 1/2 cup of tomato pasta sauce.

When you are ready to use.

  1. Place water, pasta sauce and contents of jar in a large sauce pan.
  2. Bring to a boil on high heat.
  3. Reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes, uncovered, or until pasta and veggies are tender.

Easy peasy!

Place in a cool place to store that isn’t prone to high humidity, your pantry.
Until next time!

Kay L Rice

Pickled Brussel Sprouts or Cauliflower

With the growing season coming to an end there seems to be an abundance of brussel sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage, squash.  The Autumn veggies.

Cabbage always gets put into fermentation crocks to become saurkraut, but what to do with brussel sprouts and cauliflower? Pickling.  This recipe will give you great treats to enjoy all winter as a side, salad or snack.

Ingredients

  • 5 cups of brussel sprouts or Cauliflower (I don’t mix these two together in the same jars).
  • 5 cups white vinegar
  • 5 cups of water
  • 6 tbsp canning salt
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 5 cloves garlic spit
  • 1 1/4 tsp of red pepper flakes
  • 5 sterluzed pint jars with canning lids/rings

Directions

  • Split your sprouts in half and remove the end ‘nubs’. Soak in water. About 5 min.
  • Split your cauliflower into small florets. Soak in water. About 5 minutes.
  • In a large pot bring your vinager, water, salt, sugar and pepper flakes to a rolling boil.
  • In each (hot) sterilized jar place one whole garlic clove split (2 halved).
  • Pack each jar with your brussel sprouts or Cauliflower leaving 1/2 inch head space.
  • Fill with hot vinager solution leaving 1/2 inch headspace.
  • Use spacer tool to work out air bubbles.
  • Clean rims of jars.
  • Apply lids and rings.
  • Water bath can for 15 minutes after reaching canning temperature.
  • Cool.  Wait for the “pop”.  Make sure they seal.
  • Let set for 24 hours before moving to storage.

Enjoy!

Until next time,

Mrs Kay L Rice