Pineapple Fluff Pie

This is a great simple pie to make. You do need at least 4 hours to chill.

Ingredients

  • 1 can of crushed pineapple (drained)
  • 1 cup of grated coconut shreds
  • 1 cup of whipped topping
  • 1 8 ounce package of softened cream cheese
  • 1 pkg instant lemon pudding mix
  • 1 Graham cracker crust

Directions

  1. Make sure you cream cheese is very soft.
  2. Using a mixer on low, fold in your pudding mix
  3. When well mixed, fold in by hand, 3/4 of the can of drained crushed pineapple.
  4. Fold in, by hand, the coconut shreds.
  5. Fold in the whipped topping by hand.
  6. Keep folding until well mixed.
  7. Pour into Graham cracker crust.
  8. Sprinkle remaining drained pineapple on top.
  9. Chill for a minimum of 4 hours. Overnight is best.

Enjoy. My husband also likes to eat this all mixed up with the crust throughout, this is referred to as “Pineapple Fluff” which in itself is a fantastic treat!

Until next time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice ūüćć

Lime Dream Pie

This is a simple no bake pie that is sure to wow and please. Perfect for Sunday company or a family gathering.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup of real lime juice
  • 1 14 ounce can of sweetened condensed milk
  • 4 ounces cream cheese softened
  • 2 cups of whipped topping
  • 1 baked pastry pie shell
  • 3 drops of natural food coloring
  • Thin slice lime and extra whipped topping if you like.

Directions:

  1. Beat lime juice and condensed milk until well mixed.
  2. Fold in softened cream cheese. Fold until no lumps
  3. Fold in 2 cups whipped topping until no lumps.
  4. Add in 3 to 4 drops of natural green food coloring, stir until no white streaks. Add additional drops to your liking of color.
  5. Pour into baked pastry pie shell.
  6. Decorate with thin slices of lime dipped in sugar and or additional whipped cream.
  7. Refrigerate until serving.

Enjoy!

Until next time,

Mrs. Kay L. Rice

Triple Berry Cobbler

Nothing says home like an old fashioned cobbler.  They are quick to make and are eaten even faster!  The perfect dessert for a gathering or family.  Served with a scoop of vanilla ice cream while still warm and you will melt!

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Mrs. Rice’s Triple Blueberry Cobbler

Filling:

  • 4 cups of mixed berries.¬† I enjoy Raspberries, blueberries and black berries.¬† However, you can mix this up as you like.
  • 1 cup of raw honey
  • 1/2 cup of sugar
  • 2 tablespoons of corn starch
  1. In a very large bowl, mix your berries (with your hands) with the sugar and the corn starch.
  2. Once the berries are well coated, add in your honey.  Using a large wooden spoon, fold the berries so the honey coats well.
  3. Pour into a large casserole pan.

Pie Crust Top:

This is a very basic pie crust, and my husband says he prefers a “drop crust” which to me is not a cobbler, but to each his own.¬† A drop crust is like sweet drop dumplings, which I am not going to cover here.

  • 1 1/4 cups of lard
  • 3 cups of flour
  • 1 tbsp of sugar
  • a pinch of salt
  • 1 to 2 tbsp of water
  1. In a large bowl add your flower, sugar and salt.
  2. Add in your lard and “cut” into the flour mixture (I use two butter knives to cut) until there are “marble sized” balls.
  3. Finish mixing with your hands, adding in the water if need be.  You do not want your dough too dry or too wet.
  4. Using parchment paper, sprinkle some flour on the bottom parchment paper add the ball of dough, a dusting of flour on the top and the top parchment paper.
  5. Use a rolling pen to to roll until thin and wide and long enough to cover your casserole dish corner to corner on the inside (not over the edges).
  6. Add the dough to the top of your fruit.
  7. Cut slits or designs into the top of your crust so the juices can nicely escape and not cause an overflow on the edges.
  8. Sprinkle the crust with a light dusting of sugar.
  9. Bake at 350 degrees for one hour or until the crust has a pretty golden glow to it.

Serve hot or cold.  Warm with vanilla ice cream is my ultimate favorite.

Until next time,

Mrs. Kay L. Rice

 

Mexican Street Corn

This recipe is an alteration of my favorite fried corn side dish I grew to love back home.¬† Growing it up was fried sweet corn with a bit of butter salt and pepper.¬† Now that I’m all grown up and my loving husband has introduced me to a world of new flavors from his time of Arizona, my comfort food side dish has taken on a whole new level of awesomeness.

I recently made this for a family gathering and had many requests to share the recipe.  Here it is.

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup pork lard
  • 4 cups of sweet corn
  • 1/2 onion diced
  • 2 cloves of garlic diced
  • 8 ounces roasted New Mexico Hatch Chilies (pealed and diced)
  • 1 tbsp Corn meal or corn flour
  • 1 tsp Jalapeno powder
  • 1 tbsp Chili powder
  • White soft quesadilla cheese
  • Fresh Cilantro (optional)
  • A pinch of salt

Directions:

  1. Heat a cast iron skillet and melt your lard (Do not use Crisco or butter, it won’t taste the same).
  2. Saute the onion and garlic until limp.
  3. Add in your corn and fry on a medium heat.  You want your corn to have a chard look to it.
  4. Add in your hatch chilies and continue “frying” in the skillet.
  5. Combine your jalapeno powder and chili powder together then add to your skillet, spreading it evenly over the corn while frying.  Stir in.
  6. Sprinkle in your corn flower over top of the corn and fold it in evenly.
  7. When the corn has a “roasted” look to it (it will toughen up as well), take it off the heat and transfer it into a large pan or serving dish.
  8. Sprinkle with some chili powder, grated white Mexican cheese and the fresh cilantro.
  9. Can be served cold or hot.

Feel free to add in jalapeno slices, extra peppers, some jalapeno tomato dices or even some black beans.  Yum.

Enjoy and be the hit of any late summer picnic!

Until next time,

Mrs. Kay L. Rice

 

Tomato Powder

One of the most basic garden vegetables are tomatoes, cherry or normal size.  Its how many people get hooked on growing their own food.  One reason is because they are so prolific and easy to grow.  Note, Prolific!  Cherry, grape, salad tomatoes especially will create a ton of tomatoes during a season.  While in February as you long for the taste of a fresh, real, non-store bought tomato, by September you never want to eat one again.  Yet, they still continue to cover your plants!  What to do with all of them.

Unless you pickle the cherry tomatoes, you will have to find many friends to pawn them off on, they are too much trouble to can, in my opinion.¬† If you have larger tomatoes and don’t can, you will be in this same boat.¬† I don’t like to freeze tomatoes, they take up too much room and it is a messy processes.¬† What I like to do is dehydrate them and turn them into powder.¬† Yes, you read that right.

Powdered tomatoes are perfect for a vegetable thickener in sauce and pasta dishes as well as a base vegetable bullion for soups and stews.  The best thing is that 5 pounds of tomatoes can fit into a half-pint jar!  Space!  I really like this for my cherry tomatoes because the prep goes so fast, they add up fast and nothing is left to waste.

Here are the directions.

Tomato Powder

  1. Wash your tomatoes.
  2. Cut out any blemishes and stem area.
  3. Slice thin and place on your dehydrator rack (or on a cookie sheet with parchment paper if you are going to use your oven).
  4. Make sure they are not overlapping.  Tomatoes contain a lot of water.
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  6. I place my dehydrator on medium heat and this takes about 7 hours.  If you are using your oven, use the lowest heat and crack the door open to dry your slices.
  7. Dry until they are completely crispy with NO MOISTURE.
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  9. You can leave in this state if you want to vacuum seal at this stage and use like sun dried tomatoes as well.  I have one friend that will use vinegar and oil and put the in the refrigerator to use in salads.  I prefer not to utilize refrigerator space in that way.  This state also makes a wonderful sun dried tomato salad dressing.
  10. Place your ‘chips’ in a grinder and grind until a powder.
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  12. You can also add dehydrated garlic, onion, peppers, pretty much anything you want at this stage and grind all together to make sure its well mixed.  This would make a lovely stock base.
  13. Next transfer into an airtight container that is resistant to air and to moisture.  I prefer to vac-seal my jars with the exception of one that I will use often and that one will be put in my spice cabinet.
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This powder has so many uses.  My favorite way is to add a little tomato flavor and a thickener to dishes without all the water  content.  It works great as an alternative to a small amount of tomato paste as well.

Let me know how this turned out for you!

Enjoy!

Until Next Time,

Mrs. Kay L. Rice

 

Okra

It has been a hot, rainy, humid summer here in Ohio.¬† The garden has loved it, but the one plant that has truly loved this year’s weather is our OKRA!¬† I grew up loving this vegetable which is widely used in the southern states, my family is very southern.¬† Waves at my Great Aunt Meg, who REALLY taught me to enjoy southern cooking back in Mentor, Tennessee!

I planted two varieties this year, one the shorter ruby and the other is the heirloom green, which by the way, grows taller than me.  Its a good thing my husband and I both LOVE, and that is an understatement, okra.  Because this year, I have harvested baskets of it and every day it seems that I have a new big basket to harvest every afternoon.  Yes, I am still harvesting well into September!  Okay so I may have planted 100 plants, but well, we love okra.

Now, what do you do with this odd, spiny, plant that when cooked creates what I call “Okra Boogers” or “Okra Snot” depending on who you want to shock and gross out at the time.¬† My husband refers to the okra peas as “rat eyes” especially in soups and stews.¬† Can you tell that we just love to have fun!¬† Oh, here is a warning.¬† Some people are very allergic to the fuzz that grows on okra, it causes almost a poison ivy affect to their skin.¬† I’ve never had this problem, but I do know some who do.

Okra is highly nutritious and it is filling as well as easy to grow in warm temperatures, which explains why you find it a lot in the southern states.¬† It’s very high in fiber as well as¬†containing¬†potassium,¬†vitamin B,¬†vitamin C,¬†folic acid, and¬†calcium. It’s¬†low¬†in calories and has a high¬†dietary fiber¬†content. Recently, a new benefit of including okra in your diet is being considered. Okra has been suggested to help manage¬†blood sugar¬†in cases of type 1, type 2, and gestational¬†diabetes.¬† So in short, what’s not to like.

My husband’s absolute favorite for okra, is pickled okra.

Pickled Okra

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 lb of okra
  • 1/4 clove of garlic for each jar (6)
  • 1 dill flower head for each jar (6)
  • jalapeno pepper diced fine or red pepper flakes
  • 3 cups of apple cider vinager
  • 3 cups of water
  • 1/4 cup pickling salt
  • 1 tablespoon of mustard seed
  • 6 half pint canning glass jars with lids and rings

Directions

  1. Clean your okra removing the tips and caps only (I keep some of the cap on).  Leave whole.
  2. Add 1/4 clove garlic in each jar.
  3. Add 1 dill flower in each jar.
  4. Pack your okra tightly in each jar leaving 1/2 inches head space.
  5. In a large pot on your stove.  Combine your Vinegar, water, salt, peppers, mustard seeds.
  6. Stir and bring to a full boil.  Do not stop stirring, your salt will burn.
  7. Ladle liquid into jars, leaving 1/2 inch head-space.
  8. Water bath process for 15 minutes half pints 20 minutes for pints.

 

Another way we like them is pan fried as a side dish.

Pan Fried Okra

  1.  Melt about a tablespoon of lard in a frying pan.
  2. In a bowl I whip up 1 egg and set to the side.
  3. I prepare the okra by taking off the tips and caps and slicing into thick rounds.
  4. I put all the okra into the egg batter and stir in some red pepper flakes, or some diced jalapeno.
  5. Next I add enough cornmeal to the egg and okra and stir it in the bowl to cover it all, you don’t want it corn patty thick, but just enough to give a nice coating.
  6. Once the lard is melted, add your mixture into the pan and “separate” the pieces and move around often in the hot lard to cook.
  7. You will want to watch it because it will cook fast and is easily burned.
  8. Serve hot or cold.

All this is fine and well until you realize you are becoming over run with okra, so how do you store it to enjoy later and in the winter when it is no longer in season?  In addition to the pickling, we also store two other ways.  Freezing and dehydrating.

Dehydrating your Okra

I like to dehydrate our okra because it takes up very little space, it gets rid of the “Okra Boogers” and it works fantastic for gumbos, soups and stews.

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  1. Wash your okra and remove the caps and tips.
  2. I flash steam my okra whole.
  3. Slice into rounds or wedges.¬† I like the wedges because they don’t shrink to itty-bitty pieces.
  4. Place in your dehydrator on low heat/vegetable heat and run until they are crispy and no sign of moisture.  You can also do this in the oven on the lowest temperature, door cracked upon, placing the okra on a cookie sheet with parchment paper.
  5. Vac-Seal or store in an air-tight/moisture resistance container.

The final way is to freeze the okra.¬† I try not to do this because I don’t like to fill up the freezer with vegetables that can be stored other ways, but I will freeze some.¬† You can use this as fried okra, or in soups, stews and gumbos when you need it in the off season.

Freeze Store Okra

Warning you will be dealing with lots of “Okra Boogers” in this process.

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  1. Clean your okra, remove the tips and caps.
  2. Bring a pot of water to a full boil and turn off the water.
  3. Dunk your okra (whole) in the hot water for about 3 minutes.  This is a quick blanch.
  4. Dump the hot water out from around the hot okra and now fill the pot with ice cubes.  This prevents the okra from continuing to cook from the blanching process.
  5. Now take out each okra spear and cut into rounds.
  6. For large and woody spears of okra, discard the green pod and keep the okra peas (the white seeds), these are great in soups.¬† These are what my loving husband refers to as “Rat Eyes”.
  7. Once your spears are cut into rounds, put them in your vacuum seal bags and seal.  Make sure all air is out of the bag, then freeze.  I usually store in 2 cup quantities which is about a serving.

I hope you have enjoyed this post about all things Okra!  Feel free to share your recipes and questions.

Until Next Time,

Mrs. Kay L. Rice

 

 

 

Breakfast Egg Bites

I promised several dear friends my recipe for my Breakfast Egg Bites. These are a great go to for busy mornings and a great way to budget and eat healthy. I normally make a batch of 12 for the following week. These also freeze very well.

You can change up the ingredients for your preference and what you have readily available.

Ingredients:

  • 8 large eggs
  • 2 smallish potatoes diced or shredded
  • 1 small onion diced
  • 1 cup of diced peppers of choice
  • 1 jar (4 ounces) jalapeno diced tomatoes
  • A hand full of mushrooms
  • Meat of your choice. I like chorizo.

Directions:

  1. Preheat your oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Spray your muffin pan with Bakers Secret, or coat with grease and flour like you would for a cake.
  3. In a skillet add some oil of your choice and fry up your meat. Once done set aside in a bowl.
  4. Add your potatoes and veggies and fry up as you would hashbrowns.
  5. In a large bowl whip up your eggs.
  6. Once the meat is cool, add in your meat to the eggs.
  7. Once the veggies are done and cooled down add the veggies to the eggs.
  8. Fold everything together.
  9. Now add the egg mixture to your muffin pan spots. Not quite filling them to the top.
  10. Place in oven to cook for approximately 15 to 20 min. You want them completely done but not over cooked. I check mine with a toothpick test. You want a clean toothpick.
  11. I let cool for 20 or so minutes then remove them from the pan. They shouldn’t need much help to come out if the pan.
  12. Refrigerate or freeze.

Enjoy.

Until next time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

Sweet Heat Pickle Relish

I love a good pickle relish, especially on grilled bratwurst, but my favorite is to use in ham salad, egg salad, macaroni salad, you get the picture.¬† Of course, it wouldn’t be from the Rice Household without a little spark of heat.

Here is my recipe for my Sweet Heat Pickle Relish.

Ingredients:  (Makes about 8 half-pints of relish)

  • 4 cups of finely chopped cucumbers (skin on)
  • 2 cups of finely chopped onions
  • 1 green pepper finely chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper finely chopped (or 2 green if you don’t want a red one)
  • 2 jalapeno peppers finely chopped (remove the seeds and membranes for less heat)¬† *Use Latex gloves when working with any hot pepper.
  • 1/4 cup of pickling salt
  • 2 cups of cider vinegar (canning grade)
  • 3 cups of sugar
  • 1 tsp. celery seed
  • 1 tablespoon of mustard seed

Directions:

  1. I use my Ninja processor to finely chop my items.
  2. Combine the cucumbers, onion and peppers in a very large bowl.
  3. Sprinkle with the pickling salt and toss well (please put on latex gloves to avoid burning your face and eyes).
  4. Cover with ice and cold water and set to the side.
  5. Let the mixture stand for 2 hours minimum but no longer than 6 hours.
  6. Drain well, pressing out the excess water.
  7. Combine your cider vinegar, sugar, celery seed and mustard seed in a kettle.
  8. Bring liquid to a boil to dissolve the sugar.¬† It is important you stir while heating so the sugar doesn’t burn on the bottom of your kettle.
  9. Add your chopped items to the liquid and simmer for approximately 10 minutes.
  10. Pack into prepared and sterilized half pint (or quarter pint) jars, leaving a half inch head space.
  11. Water bath process for 15 minutes.
  12. Remove from your water bath canner to a place where they can seal.
  13. The pop will confirm your jars have sealed.
  14. Leave alone to settle for 12-24 hours before putting them in your pantry.

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Sweet Heat Pickle Relish

I hope you enjoy this wonderful condiment!

Until Next Time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

 

 

Head Cheese

I was having a conversation with a good friend of mine who raises pigs.  As most of my conversations go, it turned to food.  One of the topics that came up was Head Cheese, looking for a good recipe and the appreciation of this odd concoction.  My grandpa made this after butcher season so I offered to post the process on how to make it the way I know how to make it.

Keep in mind I love pickled pigs feet, scrapple, fried pig skins and other deliciousness of the hills.¬† Making head cheese is a long drawn out process, but isn’t that the way with anything good?

Okay, so here we go.  I am not going to include pictures because I do not have access to a fresh butchered pig right now, and some of my readers may be grossed out a tad with the process.

First and foremost after the main butchering of the hog is done, comes the head prep.¬† There are no real rules to this and its done many ways.¬† The head should be cut in half to make it fit in your boiling pot (outside) a little better.¬† Hog’s heads are very large.

DAY ONE

The pig’s face needs cleaned (shaved) of random bits of whiskers.¬† Pigs have very course whiskers.¬† Clean the pig ears inside and out (yes pigs get ear wax too), grossed out yet?¬† You will be.¬† Next are the trotters, otherwise known as the feet and hocks.¬† Pigs feet are gross, yup, they wallow and step in everything and honestly uncleaned pigs feet STINK.¬† While trotters are cleaned immediately following butchering, especially if the plan is to make some pickled pigs feet and hocks, they still are gross.¬† It’s the feet that gives head cheese the thick gel, but you don’t want your cheese to smell like wet locker socks.¬† To take care of that rinse the feet in hot water to get rid of the ‘juice’.¬† Next boil a pot of water with some white vinegar.¬† Blanch the pigs feet for a minute or two and rinse them with cold water, repeat 3 to 4 times.¬† At this time you’ll notice the wet sock smell will be gone.¬† Very fresh trotters may not need this much prep, depends on your hog and how you’ve butchered it or had it butchered.

Now on to the fun stuff.  I remember this being done outside in a big boil pot.  Combine your brine in the pot:

  • 2 gallons of water
  • 2 cups of kosher salt
  • 1 cup of sugar
  • 1/2 cup of Pink Salt (processing salt used for headcheese)

Simmer your brine and cool.  Place the head and trotters in the brine to sit overnight.

DAY TWO

Rinse off the brine thoroughly.  I will tell you that the final product will retain quite a bit of salt.

Head cheese is one of those, use what you have type things so I’m going to list some basic items to include.

  • water
  • leeks/ramps
  • onion
  • parsley
  • garlic
  • peppercorns
  • bay leaves
  • nutmeg
  • allspice
  • vinagar

Put everything back in your large pot to cook for 4 hours.  All the flavors will meld together throughout the process.

Maintain a simmer in the pot.  Again, this should be done outside over an open fire, the smoke will lend to the final flavor.

After 4 hours the jawbone should easily separate from the rest of the skull.  The liquid should have a golden hue to it.  Drain the golden liquid out and set in the refrigerator to sit overnight (this will create your jelly).

Next, get comfy, because you are in for a lot of picking and sitting.  Put on some gloves, and once the head and trotters are cooled down enough to handle, spread out a place to pick all the meat off the head and trotters.  Spread your head and trotters out to cool, if you put the in another pot, they will only stay hot.

What to shred and keep is always up for discussion.  However, things like the eyes should be discarded.  The tongue, take out and skin and set it aside wrapped in the refrigerator.  Pull the meat first, you should have plenty to not worry about adding any of the skin or fat.

At the end of the day, cover the pork meat and put in the refrigerator.

DAY THREE  (I told you this was a long process)

Pull out your broth.¬† It should be gelatin, under a layer of pork fat.¬† Scrape off the pork fat.¬† This isn’t as easy as it sounds because the gelatin isn’t very firm.

Heat your gelatin on the stove until it becomes liquid again.  Strain the liquid using a micro-weave cheesecloth this pulls out any impurities.

After straining the liquid, put it back on the burner until it’s reduced by a third.¬† This takes a while so you can turn your attention to the meat mixture.

Take your pieces of pork and add the seasonings you like.  This is always up for taste.  I remember the seasoning being sage, rosemary and thyme with a little red pepper.  But that is up to you.  Mix your seasoning with your pork with gloves on.  Shred larger pieces as you mix through the meat, keep the fat that is with the meat.

Taste your gelatin once it’s reduced.¬† If it needs more salt, add it here.¬† You might also need to add a touch of vinegar, but that’s to taste and preference.

Remember the tongue that was set a side?  Take it out and cube it up.  You can always saved some for sandwiches.  Add in the cubed tongue meat to the pork bits, stir in.

Line your bread loaf pans with clear wrap (you’ll need a several bread loaf pans).¬† Make sure you use enough to cover the bottom, sides and plenty to wrap over the top.

Now pack in bread loaf pans.¬† Do not pack super tight, loose but full.¬† Tap down to where there isn’t much space between bits.

Pour your gelatin mixture over the pork bits in the pans.  Cover with the clear wrap over the top.

Put in the refrigerator to cool.

DAY FOUR

The next day you go to the fridge and there you have it.  Head cheese.

headcheese

It can bee eaten plain, on bread, on crackers, as a sandwich.

Enjoy!

Until Next Time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

 

Ginger Turmeric Kombucha

My journey into making Kombucha (a fermented tea drink which is healthy for the gut) began several months ago, a very good friend gave me the instructions and my first SCOBY which you need to make this wonderful drink.¬† The SCOBY is living ‘healthy’ bacteria that resembles a flat jelly fish, or the weird creatures from one of the original Star Trek series…. You know the one, admit it.¬† Anyway, SCOBY¬†is actually an acronym: Symbiotic Culture Of Bacteria and Yeast.¬† It is what does the job in making your Kombucha.¬† Ginger and Turmeric are wonderful natural roots that are great for the stomach and inflammation plus they taste YUMMY!

You will need several items just to get started:

  1. Two 1 gallon Glass jars, you can get them at glass jars at amazon
  2. A minimum of 6 swing top bottles, again at Amazon here swing top bottles
  3. Your SCOBY, if you don’t have a friend who has a live one living in her SCOBY hotel, guess what, you can get that from Amazon Too.¬†¬†SCOBY
  4. 2 cups of sugar
  5. 3 tea bags of green or black tea.
  6. 1 gallon of FILTERED PURE WATER.  Do not, I repeat, to not use tap water, the chlorine and fluoride will kill you SCOBY.
  7. Starter and again if you don’t have a friend who is already brewing, yup, you guessed it go to Amazon.¬†¬†Kombucha Starter

DIRECTIONS

  1. Brew your sweet tea (sugar, water and tea) and let cool until it is room temperature.  This is important, room temperature.
  2. Once the tea cools (NOT COLD), pour into the large glass jar
  3. Wash your hands with vinegar, yes, you read that correctly this helps you not infect your SCOBY with your germs.
  4. Float the SCOBY on the surface.  It may sink but that is okay.
  5. Gently add in 1-2 cups of the unflavored starter that is at room temperature.
  6. Cover with a breathable cloth but something fruit flies can not get through.  I use a micro mesh cheese cloth and double it.
  7. Tighten with a rubber band.
  8. Sit in a quiet place away from sunlight and cold as cold will slow the growth of the bacteria.  War is okay but not too warm.
  9. Let ferment for 7-10 days (14 has been perfect for us).  This step is very flexible.  The shorter the first ferment the sweeter the brew, the longer the ferment the more sour as the yeast feeds off the sugar from the sweet tea.
  10. Once Ready, wash your hands with vinegar and remove your SCOBY and put in the second jar with some of the tea from the first jar (I put a cup in the first time, now more because if have a bunch in my hotel).
  11. You may need to separate your SCOBYs because they will meld together as you continue to use them.  Each new batch will grow a baby SCOBY to the Mother SCOBY.
  12. Fill your flip top bottles to the bottom of the neck, NOT to the top of the bottle.
  13. For the Ginger Turmeric, I add one teaspoon of diced fresh Ginger and 1 teaspoon of diced fresh turmeric root (both peeled).
  14. Save 2 cups of this batch of the fermented tea (starter) for use for your next batch.  Keep it going by starting at the first step all over again.
    1. I also date these and have now started a rotation of 2 batches soon to be 3 rotation so we have kombucha ready when desired.
  15. Cap each bottle with the top.  And store in a cool dark place. for about 5-7 days.
  16. Once you are ready to enjoy your brew, CAREFULLY open the bottle.
  17. This is why you only fill to the base of the neck, it will FIZZ, alot.  I have found its best to open slowly in a high top bowl.  The sweeter the tea and the higher the sugar content (ginger has a lot) the more it will fizz as a result of the second brew (flavor brew).
  18. Keep in the refrigerator once opened and enjoy!

FLAVORS:

My husband and I love the Ginger Turmeric and really have no want at this time to change it up.¬† Plus, these roots are great for the gut and inflammation.¬† However, you can play with flavors, some I’ve seen are Orange Ginger; Strawberry Lemon; Blueberry Lemon; Raspberry; Elderberry and so many others.¬† Just remember, the more the sugar, the more active the Fizz.

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Now, about your SCOBY Hotel:

I keep my old SCOBYs in a ‘SCOBY Hotel’ which is basically a glass jar with stacks of SCOBYs.¬† Treat these like the fermenting kombucha by covering them with a breathable cloth and add sweet tea once in a while for food.¬† They love their sweet teas!¬† Feed them about once a month or so.¬† You will also see growth spurts in your SCOBYs at that time.¬† I rotate them between batches.¬† There are all kinds of uses for SCOBYs if you get too many teach a friend how to make Kombucha and donate a SCOBY.¬† They are great to add to a compost bin because of the healthy bacteria.¬† Mother Earth News just had a recipe in making SCOBY treats (think healthy gummies).

Enjoy your brewing.

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice