Pasta Fagioli Soup

After making this soup many times at home I decided to share it with my Women’s Bible Group one evening.  As it turns out, it was very well liked.  Since I was asked to share my recipe, here it is!

This is an amazing white and red bean soup with such an amazing savory broth and pasta that it can not help but give you that warm home feeling!

pfsoup

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound ground turkey
  • 1 small onion diced small (1 cup)
  • 1 large carrot diced (1 cup)
  • 3 stalks celery, chopped (1 cup)
  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 2  14-ounce cans of diced tomatoes
  • 1 15-ounce can of red kidney beans with liquid
  • 1 15-ounce can great northern white beans with liquid
  • 1 15-ounce can of tomato sauce
  • 1 12-ounce can V-8 sauce
    • NOTE:  Instead of the tomato sauce, tomatoes and V-8 I use my own Italian Soup Stock
  • 1 tablespoon of white vinegar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons of salt
  • 1 teaspoon of FRESH oregano
  • 1 teaspoon FRESH basil
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon of FRESH thyme
  • 1/2 pound (1/2 a box) of Ditalini pasta

Directions:

  1. Brown your ground turkey in a large saucepan or pot over medium heat.
  2. Drain off most of the fat.
  3. Add onion, carrot, celery and garlic and saute for approximately 10 minutes with the meat.
  4. Put all the items in your crock pot.
  5. Add in the remaining ingredients, except the pasta.
  6. Turn your crockpot on low and cook for 6ish hours.
  7. About 45 min before serving, boil and drain your pasta until a touch less than done.
  8. Add your pasta to your crockpot and continue to cook on warm for the remainder of the 45 minutes.
  9. Serve.
  10. Enjoy!

I hope you enjoy this recipe!  Please let me know if you enjoyed the recipe and if you added your own touches to improve.

Until next time,

Mrs. Kay L. Rice

 

 

Canning Basic Green Beans

A staple in our home is the basic green bean. I will say for the most part in this household we doctor up our green beans with onion, garlic & of course jalapeño peppers. However, the following is just your basic run of the mill green beans canning recipe. Enjoy. 

First things first. Green beans must be pressure canned. So be sure to understand how to operate, maintenance, care and clean your pressure canner. 

We get our green beans mostly from farm markets and always in season. A half bushel should give you approximately 13 quarts of snapped green beans. 

First wash and snap your green beans. 

I like to give the a quick blanch wash of three minutes in boiling water. However, some people don’t do this. It’s up to you. The argument is that cold packing keeps the beans crisper. I don’t notice a difference. 

As always make sure your glass quart jars are sterilized by boiling or dishwasher. 

Take your center lids and steep them in boiling water while you work on filing the jars. 

Now, I use quart jars because honestly, pint jars of green beans is rather skimpy for me, in size. Green beans warm up well with leftovers, so to me, it’s easier to put then up as quarts. 

Fill your jar to the base of the neck with your beans. 

Fill all your jars. 

If you add salt use a pickling and preserving salt. This will prevent a cloudiness in your beans. 

Add water to the jars but leave a 1 inch headspace. 

Wipe the rims with a clean towel. 

Place your rims on your jars. I use a magnet stick to pull my kids out of the hot water. 

Attach the ring to the lid. Tighten the lid but not so much that you strain something. 

Place the jars in the canner. Add water to your canner, per specification and size of your canner.  You can also add a tablespoon of white vinegar to the water in the canner to prevent calcium buildup. 

Put your lid on your canner and click it shut. Leave the stopper off. Turn on the heat. I generally start mine at 7 never full blast heat. 

Once you start to get a steady stream of steam from the vent set the timer to 10 minutes. 

When the timer goes off your button should be straight up. When the button is up put your ‘stopper’ on. 

Watch your gauge closely when you hit 11-12 lbs start your timer for 25 minutes for quarts (20 min for pints). 

Please watch your pressure gauge closely adjusting your heat appropriately to keep it at 11-12 lbs. Do NOT ever leave your canner unattended during this phase. It only takes a second to hit a dangerous level of pressure. 

When your timer goes off. Turn off the heat and leave the canner alone. Do not fiddle with the stopper, or the button and no matter what do NOT be a dork and open the canner. It will take a while, 30 min or so, to naturally cool down. 

When the button drops it will be safe to open your canner. 

There WILL be hot steam. Do not be careless while taking the lid off. Skin does not grow back easily!

Gently remove your jars and place them in a prepared place on a thick towel to cool. This place should be out of the reach of kids, pets etc. And will need to stay in this place for 24 hours.

Once your jars begin to cool you will hear that lovely sound. POP! This means a jar has sealed. There should be a pop for each jar. Don’t try to cheat and push the lids to make them seal, they won’t. 

If you have a jar that doesn’t seal, put it in the refrigerator & use it first. 

Never reuse your center lids. The only parts that can be reused are the rings & the jars. 

Mark your lids with contents & date & move to your pantry. 

Enjoy! 

Mrs. Kay L Rice

Canning Rehydrated Black Beans

Canning is a skill that both men & women should be comfortable with. That’s just my opinion, of course. There is much to he said for providing for yourself. The pride in doing so, the benefits of not having unnecessary gunk added to your food & the cost. 

At our home we buy dried beans to store in our dry goods shelves & can them Rehydrated for the quick meal later down the road. One bag of black beans can give you 7 pints of Rehydrated beans for ready to use meals.

Beans, like meats, must be processed in a pressure canner. Pints take 75 minutes to can (once pressure is reached). Do yourself a favor and dedicate the day to do a bunch of beans! It’s well worth the time and effort because that single page of dried black beans may cost you approximately $1.49 but when you can get 7-8 pints out of it you are looking at 22¢ a pint, with flavors you decide. 

So here we go! 

Please make sure you know how to properly operate, maintenance, check and care for a pressure canner before you can. 

I hot soak my bag of beans for about half a day. Making sure any stones or icky beans are disposed of.

Make sure that your pint jars are sterilized. Taking them out of a sealed box does not mean ready to go. Either boil your jars your run the through the dishwasher. I prefer to boil.

Off to the side put your center rings in a bowl and put hot boiling water over them and let them sit. 

Take your clean jars and measure 2/3 cup of black beans into each jar. This is only if you have not completely Rehydrated them. They will need room to expand as they cook during the canning process. 

If you add salt use salt specifically for pickling and preserving. This prevents a cloudiness to your beans. 

You can add other seasonings at this point as well like chili peppers, jalapeño peppers, ancho powder, etc.

Add hot water to each jar but leave 1 inch of headspace. Wipe the rim of the jar with a clean towel.

Place the center lid on your jar.

I use a magnet stick to pull out the lids from the hot water. 

Now put in your outer ring. Tight but not Goliath tight. 

Place them in your pressure canner according to YOUR canners specifications & size. 

Put the water in the canner to your canners specifications. 

After checking your lid, band, exhaust tube put on your lid until it fits correct and shuts. 

Turn on the heat, I start at 7 on my electric range. Do NOT go maximum heat. Leave your ‘stopper’ off. 

When you start to get a steady stream of steam from the stopper tube, set your timer for 10 minutes. Never walk away from your canner!

When the timer goes off, the latch in the back should be up. 

Now put your ‘stopper’on the vent. Watch closely as the pressure raises to 12 lbs. 

Set your timer for 75 minutes. You will need to adjust your heat to keep it at 11-12 lbs pressure. By the end my range is normally at about 3 on the eye heat. Do not leave unattended! It only takes seconds to jump to a dangerous pressure weight. 

When your timer goes off, turn the heat off the eye, leave the canner alone & for the love of all things good do not release the stopper or try to open the canner!!!!

It will take a while, like almost an hour, to naturally cool and release the pressure. When the button goes down on its own and the gauge reads 0 only then do you open the canner.

THERE WILL BE HOT STEAM!!!! Don’t be a dork when taking the lid off! Use caution! 

Make sure you place a towel where your jars can sit undisturbed to cool (away from kids, pets, etc.) For at least 24 hours. 

Using your jar tongs take the jars out of the canner and place on towel. 

As your jars cool you will hear that magical sound of POP. You should hear a pop for each jar. 

Do NOT push the lids to force a pop. The jars must pop naturally to seal.

Let cool. Mark your lids after 24 hours and put on your shelf for use.

If you have a jar that does not seal, put it in the refrigerator and use first. 

Never, ever, ever reuse the center lid. You only reuse the rim/ring and jar!

Enjoy!

Mrs. Kay L. Rice