Spicy Black Bean Soup

The perfect soup to warm you up on cold days.

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb dehydrated black beans
  • 4 slices of bacon cut into 1/2 inch squares (smoked bacon is best)
  • 3 garlic cloves, finely diced
  • 1 large tomato chopped
  • 1 large green chili chopped (or a small can of diced chilies)
  • 2 whole dried chipotle peppers
  • 1 cup of diced peppers (Bell peppers for no extra heat, otherwise you pick your mix, cooking will bring out the heat)
  • 6 cups pork or chicken broth
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp chili powder
  • 1 tbsp red wine vinager
  • 1 can of canned black beans
  • 1 tbsp corn flour
  • Salt & pepper to taste.

Directions:

The night before, sort your dehydrated beans, make sure there are no stones or pods or stems from packaging. Hey, it happens.

Add enough water to cover your beans plus 3 to 4 inches extra water. Add a teaspoon of baking soda to cut down on “belly gas” after eating. Let sit overnight.

  1. The next morning rinse your beans and put in a large crockpot.
  2. In a large frying pan cook your bacon until cooked but not crumbly.
  3. Remove bacon from pan.
  4. Add your onion, garlic, green chili and peppers to the bacon grease and saute until your onion is starting to become translucent.
  5. Add your bacon & vegetables to the crockpot.
  6. Add your diced tomato to the crockpot.
  7. Add your dehydrated chipotle peppers to the crockpot.
  8. Add your broth & red wine vinager to the crockpot & stir.
  9. Cook on high for 4-5 hours.
  10. Once the beans in your soup are soft, put your canned black beans in a bowl and mash them.
  11. Add the corn flour to the mashed beans and mash together until well mixed.
  12. Add the mashed beans and corn flour to your crockpot stirring so the mashed beans don’t clump creating little bean dumplings.
  13. Add in your seasonings: cumin, chili powder, black pepper and salt.
  14. Cook on low for another 30 minutes.

Serve with cornbread & enjoy.

This soup can be pressure canned for shelf safe future use. Pressure Can as you would for meats.

Until next time,

Mrs. Kay Rice

Old-Fashioned Spicy Chow-Chow Relish

Summer is here! The gardens are growing fast and just waiting to burst with all kinds of treasures! Now is the busy time of year, as we prepare to work like busy ants and prepare for the long winter months ahead.

I enjoy making relish type preserves. Be it pickle style relish or hot pepper style relishes. A common relish made by the Amish is called Chow Chow. The recipe below is for a spicy Chow Chow. Canning steps are included.

Spicy Chow-Chow

Recipe makes 12 pints

Ingredients:

  • 2 quarts of green beans
  • 1 large head of cauliflower (separated into floweretes)
  • 3 cups of shelled baby lima beans
  • 3 cups of fresh whole kernel corn
  • 1 quart of chopped onions
  • 4 sweet green peppers chopped
  • 1 – 4 of your favorite hot pepper chopped and deveined and seeded (Note: You choose your level of pain, jalapeno pepper on up. If you want no heat, add in a sweet bell pepper of a different color other than green to the peppers above.)
  • 2 quarts of chopped green tomatoes
  • 3 quarts of apple cider vinegar
  • 4 cups of sugar
  • 1/2 cup of pickling salt
  • 2 tablespoons of celery seed
  • 2 tablespoons of yellow mustard seed
  • 2 tablespoons of dry mustard
  • 1 tablespoon of powdered turmeric

Directions:

  1. Cut the green beans into 1/2 inch pieces.
  2. Cook the green beans, cauliflower floweretes, lima beans and corn separately in boiling water until barely tender.
  3. Drain, mix with the onions, peppers and tomatoes in a very large kettle.
  4. In a separate pot, bring the vinegar to boil.
  5. Add in the sugar, salt, celery seed, mustard seed, dry mustard and turmeric into the boiling vinegar and stir until the sugar is dissolved completely.
  6. Pour the vinegar mixture over the vegetables.
  7. Bring to a boil and cook for 15 to 20 minutes or until thoroughly heated. Stir throughout the boiling process.
  8. Ladle into sterilized canning jars leaving 1/2 inches headspace (approximately 12 pint jars will be needed).
  9. Process your lids according to the water bath or steam bath method you are using for your canner.
  10. Place lids and bands on a clean top canning jar and screw on tight (not like Sampson tight, but tight enough to hold well.)
  11. Water bath/Steam bath can for 25 minutes.
  12. Take out of the canner and let rest for 24 hours (don’t move from their resting place for 24 hours).
  13. Listen for the glorious pop sound of the jar sealing.
  14. If any of the jars do not seal, you can exchange lids and re-can the jar or put that jar in the refrigerator to be the first to enjoy.
  15. Always refrigerate after opening a jar or an unsealed jar.
  16. The sealed jars will last about 2-3 years in a cool pantry.

Enjoy!

Until Next Time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

Spiced Ham (Spam)

spamSandwich spread, spiced ham, ham loaf, Spam.  It has many names.  I’m sure as soon as you read “spam” you either thought “Yes!” or you may have thrown up a little.  I will tell you that homemade “spam” is nothing like today’s cheap meat in a can Spam.   Depending on the spices you use in making it, it can be different every time you make it as well.

You can also “can” this wonderful concoction and make it into a sandwich “spread”, but it will cook in the jar, as does any meat.

So, here we go:

Ingredients:

  • 1½ pounds fatty pork shoulder, cubed
  • ¼ pound skinless pork belly, cubed
  • ¼ pound ham, cubed
  • 1½ teaspoons pickling salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1/8 teaspoon dried jalapeno powder (we like spice)
  • 1½ teaspoons sugar
  • ½ teaspoon  garlic diced
  • ½ teaspoon dehydrated onion flake (or dehydrated ramp flakes)
  • ½ cup ice water

Directions:

  1. To make the grinding easier, place the pork, spread out in the freezer on a tray until well chilled.  Not frozen, just well chilled.  You are working with RAW PORK, PLEASE USE PROPER FOOD PRECAUTIONS, KEEP YOUR MEAT SEPARATED AND AWAY FROM OTHER FOOD.
  2. Once everything is chilled, process the pork in sections in a food processor, once  each one achieves the texture you desire add to a large bowl. I like my ham a little bigger pieces then the pork and pork belly.
  3. Now add all your meat together and mix with a mixer with the spices.
  4. Slowly add in the ice water to the meat and spices.  You want to mix this until it is emulsified well.  Meat paste.  (I do realize that sounds gross….)

NON CANNING METHOD:

  • Transfer into a greased small loaf pans; smooth top with a greased rubber spatula. Cover tightly with aluminum foil and place in a larger pan with 2-inch tall sides. Fill the larger pan with hot water halfway up the sides of the loaf pan. Bake in a preheated 300°F oven for 1½ hours. Let cool completely before removing from pan. Cut into thick slices and serve cold or shallow fried until crusty.

CANNING METHOD:

  • Requires a pressure caner.  Make sure you understand completely how to pressure can meat before doing this method!
  • Prepare your WIDE MOUTH Pint Jars as you would for normal meat preserving.
  • Make sure your meat mixture has NOTHING FROZEN LEFT IN IT!!!! NEVER can anything that is frozen or overly cold!
  • Pack your meat mixture into your jars leaving 1 1/2 inch head space.
  • Do not add any additional moisture.
  • Clean the edges of your jars, place your lids and rings (tightly but not like Samson tightly)
  • Place in your pressure caner and FOLLOW YOUR CANER’S DIRECTIONS!
  • Meat MUST pressure can for 75 minutes for pints once it reaches the canning stage.
  • Let your caner de-pressurize, and once you remove your jars, you will need to leave sitting for at least 24 hours.  Make sure they seal.
  • Place on your pantry shelf and you have processed spam as a quick grab.

NOTE:  The canning method COOKS the meat in the jar, so it is the shape of the jar.  Using the Wide Mouth jars allows you to “slide” it out of the jar and slice the spam and then fry or use as a spread, its already cooked!

It may seem like a lot of work, but the flavor is so much better than anything that is mass produced!  You will never eat store bought again!

Until Next Time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

 

 

 

Sweet Heat Pickle Relish

I love a good pickle relish, especially on grilled bratwurst, but my favorite is to use in ham salad, egg salad, macaroni salad, you get the picture.  Of course, it wouldn’t be from the Rice Household without a little spark of heat.

Here is my recipe for my Sweet Heat Pickle Relish.

Ingredients:  (Makes about 8 half-pints of relish)

  • 4 cups of finely chopped cucumbers (skin on)
  • 2 cups of finely chopped onions
  • 1 green pepper finely chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper finely chopped (or 2 green if you don’t want a red one)
  • 2 jalapeno peppers finely chopped (remove the seeds and membranes for less heat)  *Use Latex gloves when working with any hot pepper.
  • 1/4 cup of pickling salt
  • 2 cups of cider vinegar (canning grade)
  • 3 cups of sugar
  • 1 tsp. celery seed
  • 1 tablespoon of mustard seed

Directions:

  1. I use my Ninja processor to finely chop my items.
  2. Combine the cucumbers, onion and peppers in a very large bowl.
  3. Sprinkle with the pickling salt and toss well (please put on latex gloves to avoid burning your face and eyes).
  4. Cover with ice and cold water and set to the side.
  5. Let the mixture stand for 2 hours minimum but no longer than 6 hours.
  6. Drain well, pressing out the excess water.
  7. Combine your cider vinegar, sugar, celery seed and mustard seed in a kettle.
  8. Bring liquid to a boil to dissolve the sugar.  It is important you stir while heating so the sugar doesn’t burn on the bottom of your kettle.
  9. Add your chopped items to the liquid and simmer for approximately 10 minutes.
  10. Pack into prepared and sterilized half pint (or quarter pint) jars, leaving a half inch head space.
  11. Water bath process for 15 minutes.
  12. Remove from your water bath canner to a place where they can seal.
  13. The pop will confirm your jars have sealed.
  14. Leave alone to settle for 12-24 hours before putting them in your pantry.

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Sweet Heat Pickle Relish

I hope you enjoy this wonderful condiment!

Until Next Time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

 

 

Dill Pickles

It’s now the end of July and the garden is in full force!  Especially the cucumbers, okra, eggplant and squash.

Every pantry should have some pickles tucked away as special treat.  Here is my favorite dill pickle brine recipe.  This is a very versatile recipe that can be used with beans (dilly beans), okra, squash, eggplant and especially cucumbers, just replace the cucumber spears with beans, okra or squash.

Ingredients (Makes 8 pints):

  • 4 pounds of pickling cucmbers
  • 8 heads of fresh dill
  • 8 cleaned cloves of garlic
  • 1/2 cup of pickling salt
  • 4 cups of apple cider vinegar (canning grade)
  • 4 cups of water
  • 1 tablespoon mustard seeds
  • 1 tsp red pepper flakes (optional)

Directions:

  1. Prepare your pint jars for canning (wash/sterilize).
  2. Prepare your water bath canner.
  3. Slice your cucumbers into spears that fit into pint jars leaving 1/2 inch head-space.
    1. For Okra, slice off the stems, leave the caps, and slice off the tip of the bottom.
    2. For dilly beans, remove the top stem area and the tip at the bottom.
    3. For squash slice like you would cucumbers.
    4. For eggplant, slice into rounds or into strips, skin on.
  4. Pack each jar tightly.
  5. Add one clove of garlic and one head of dill in each jar.
  6. Add in your red pepper flakes if you choose to have spicy.
  7. In a large pot combine your vinegar, water, mustard seeds and salt and bring to a boil.
  8. Pour hot liquid into each jar, leaving 1/2 inch head-space.
  9. Clean the mouth of each jar, placing on the lids and rings.  Make sure your rings are tight, but not like Hercules tight.
  10. Place in your water bath canner and process for 10 minutes AFTER your water bath canner reaches a full boil.  (Please refer to your canner’s directions for best results).
  11. Remove and cool, they will POP when sealed.
  12. It’s best to leave sitting for 12-24 hours before moving into storage.

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Dill pickles

Enjoy!

Until Next Time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

 

 

 

Sweet Summer Squash Pickles

The one thing about yellow crook neck (summer squash) is it’s either feast or famine! I intentionally planted 8 plants in our garden this year. We love this beautiful golden squash all sizes and prepares many ways. My favorite, and our grandson’s favorite, is sweet summer squash pickles. This is a recipe that uses water bath canning for storage.

Sweet Summer Squash Pickles

Ingredients:

  • 8 cups of summer squash sliced thin, not paper thin. Smaller sizes are best, larger circles can be quartered or halved.
  • 2 cups sweet onion, sliced thin,rings or half rings.
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 4 green peppers, small. Diced into small cubes, no seeds please.
  • 3 cups sugar
  • 2 cups canning grade Apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tsp mustard seed
  • 2 tsp celery seed.

Directions:

  1. Place sliced squash and sliced onion in a large bowl.
  2. Mix well with salt (to pull out moisture)
  3. Set squash aside for 30 min to an hour.
  4. Prepare in a large boil pot add your remaining ingredients: vinegar, sugar, peppers, celery seed, mustard seed.
  5. Bring to a rolling boil while stiring. Remove from heat.
  6. Transfer your squash mix into a large draining bowel to drain off pulled out moisture. Do not rinse.
  7. Add squash onion mix into the hot brine mix and stir in for about 5 min.
  8. Transfer into sterilized prepared jars for canning.
  9. Water bath can for 10 min at high boil. (Follow water bath instructions).
  10. Remove and cool.

After the joyous pops of sealed jars I do my best to not open for at least 2 weeks. I TRY anyway.

Enjoy!

Until next time,

Mrs. Kay Lynn Rice

Pickled Brussel Sprouts or Cauliflower

With the growing season coming to an end there seems to be an abundance of brussel sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage, squash.  The Autumn veggies.

Cabbage always gets put into fermentation crocks to become saurkraut, but what to do with brussel sprouts and cauliflower? Pickling.  This recipe will give you great treats to enjoy all winter as a side, salad or snack.

Ingredients

  • 5 cups of brussel sprouts or Cauliflower (I don’t mix these two together in the same jars).
  • 5 cups white vinegar
  • 5 cups of water
  • 6 tbsp canning salt
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 5 cloves garlic spit
  • 1 1/4 tsp of red pepper flakes
  • 5 sterluzed pint jars with canning lids/rings

Directions

  • Split your sprouts in half and remove the end ‘nubs’. Soak in water. About 5 min.
  • Split your cauliflower into small florets. Soak in water. About 5 minutes.
  • In a large pot bring your vinager, water, salt, sugar and pepper flakes to a rolling boil.
  • In each (hot) sterilized jar place one whole garlic clove split (2 halved).
  • Pack each jar with your brussel sprouts or Cauliflower leaving 1/2 inch head space.
  • Fill with hot vinager solution leaving 1/2 inch headspace.
  • Use spacer tool to work out air bubbles.
  • Clean rims of jars.
  • Apply lids and rings.
  • Water bath can for 15 minutes after reaching canning temperature.
  • Cool.  Wait for the “pop”.  Make sure they seal.
  • Let set for 24 hours before moving to storage.

Enjoy!

Until next time,

Mrs Kay L Rice

Pickled Cauliflower and Carrots with Hot Peppers

Today I scored at the Farmers market with a gigantic head of cauliflower.  Plus our Peppers are coming on heavy right now!  So, into the kitchen I go!

Here is my receipt for our pickled vegetables.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1 tsp corriandor seeds
  • 2 cups cider vinegar
  • 1 cup water
  • 5 medium cloves garlic, lightly crushed and peeled
  • Several thick slices peeled fresh ginger
  • One-half sweet onion, thinly diced
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2 Tbs. Pickling salt
  • 1/2 tsp. ground turmeric
  • 1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
  • One head cauliflower, cut into 1-1/2- to 2-inch florets
  • 5 medium carrots, peeled and sliced 1/2 inch thick on the diagonal
  • 5 green and red hot peppers I use caribbean bells and jalapenos
  • Directions
  • Put your seeds in a pan and heat until the are slightly roasted.
  • Add in your remaining spices, vinager, ginger, garlic, onion and water and bring to a boil.
  • Pack your veggies in hot pint jars.
  • Pour the brine over your veggies leaving half inch headspace.
  • Process water bath for 10 minutes.
  • Until next time,
  • Mrs. Kay Rice 🌶️
  • Winter is Coming… Preparing your Pantry

    The purpose of home canning and meal prepping is to prepare for times when fruits and vegetables and meats are not as abundant naturally.  When an item is in season, it is more abundant and less expensive, this is the time to prepare for winter, especially when you live in the northern and Midwest areas.  Winter can be harsh.  We believe in canning what is in season, naturally, to help with budget costs, health benefits and being more ‘God sufficient’ than man sufficient.  The other side point to preparing and budgeting your food storage is to better understand what a REAL portion of food is.  America has gotten really bad at ‘super sizing’ and over convenience everything.  We’ve gotten into the mindset of “getting our money’s worth” instead of planning and looking at what our body needs.  The sugar and preservative addictions are just as bad as the “bad addictions”.  Look at the rise of obesity, health issues, enabling etc.  If we are stressed, we head strait for the candy jar, if a child is crying we hand them a sweet treat.  I could go on and on about this subject, because I myself suffer from stress eating and weight issues.  I come from a long line of Southern Cooks.  I love my butter, gravy and I melt with Shrimp and Grits.  Which is all fine, IN MODERATION.

    But, back to preparing your pantry.  Each year it is essential to take stock of what your family will need for the upcoming year until the next season arrives with more goodies.  Also knowing crop rotation years help too.  One year may be a great corn year, the next nothing.

    Now the big thing I want you to really take notice of is the PORTION of each item.  If we ate this way, I’m willing to bet, the weight loss programs out there would loose a lot of money and we would have more in our savings!

    The Canner’s Pantry Planner:
    Food Times/Week Serving Jars/Person Jars/Family(4)
    Meats, Poultry, Fish 4x week, 36 weeks 1/2 cup 36 Pints 144 Pints
    Soups 2x week, 36 weeks 1 cup 18 quarts 72 quarts
    Jams, Jellies, Preserves 6x week, 52 weeks 2 tablespoons 40 1/2 pints 160 1/2 pints
    Relishes 3x week, 52 weeks 1 tablespoon 5 pints 20 pints
    Greens, carrots, sweet potatoes, winter squash 4x week, 36 weeks 1/2 cup 18 quarts 72 quarts
    Pickled vegetables 2x week, 52 weeks 2 1/2 tablespoons 13 pints 52 pints
    Juices and Tomatoes 7x week, 36 weeks 1 cup 63 quarts 252 quarts
    All Other Fruits and Vegetables 14x week, 36 weeks 1/2 cup 76 quarts 304 quarts
    Pickled Fruits, Pickled Eggs 2x week, 52 weeks 2 1/2 tablespoons/ 1 egg 13 quarts 52 quarts

    Did you slightly freak out over the portions? Puts things into perspective doesn’t it? Here is the thing I have discovered, when you utilize the mentality of using what you have on hand, you waste less, you eat less, and you have that pride of providing. It’s amazing how the world’s perspectives dissolve when you start living like this.

    There are other items to consider as well, the meat covers what you should have in your freezer as well as canning, but there are dry goods to consider:  Flour, Sugar, Baking Soda/powder, yeast, dried beans, rice, powders.  Then your wet goods such as honey, syrups, molasses.  Also your perishables, eggs & milk.  There is also cellar storage to consider, potatoes, sweet potatoes, hard squash, apples.  But all in all the portions stay the same.  Now my favorite:  Cheeses.  I love real cheese, love it!  But a portion is only 2 ounces.  That’s the size of 2 dice.

    I credit the knowledge of this from my Grandma Inez and my go to book “The Encyclopedia of Country Living” by Carla Emery.

    So learn to enjoy and appreciate what you have and you will find that your body and your savings will thank you!

    Enjoy and let me know of your thoughts.

    Until Next Time,

    Mrs. Kay L. Rice

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    Canning Basics

    With the gardens being in full swing now that we reach the beginning of August, it is a very, very busy place here in the Rice household.  Nothing and I do mean NOTHING goes to waste.  God is truly blessing us this year with a bounty of fruits, berries and vegetables!

    I have been receiving a lot of questions about times and what can be water bath canned and what has to be pressure canned.  So, I decided to lay it out simply here.  My two tried and true resources are my Grandma and Mom of course and my absolutely favorite resource book.  The Encyclopedia of Country Living by Carla Emery.  When my husband and I first started to become close, we discovered we had the exact same book.  We truly are two peas in a pod.  But anyway, here are the outlines for Canning.

    Water Bath Canning (think fruits and pickles) The times and sizes are for after reaching a full boil in your canner.

    • Apples  Pints 20 min.  Quarts 20 min.
    • Applesauce  Pints 20 min. Quarts 20 min.
    • Apricots   Pints 25 min.  Quarts 30 min.
    • Berries    Pints 15 min.    Quarts 20 min.
    • Cherries (pitted)  Pints 25 min.  Quarts 25 min.
    • Cranberries    Pints 15 min.   Quarts 15 min.
    • Currants         Pints 15 min.   Quarts 15 min.
    • Figs                  Pints 45 min.   Quarts 50 Min.
    • Fruit Juices    Pints 5 min.       Quarts 10 min.
    • Peaches          Pints 25 min.     Quarts 30 min.
    • Pears             Pints 25 min.     Quarts 30 min.
    • Plums            Pints 10 min.      Quarts 10 min.
    • Preserves      Pints 20 min.       Quarts 20 min.
    • Rhubarb        Pints  10 min.       Quarts 10 min.
    • Strawberries  Pints 15 min .       Quarts 15 min.  (Better frozen)
    • Tomatoes (yes tomatoes are a fruit) (you must add citric acid or lemon juice! To water bath tomatoes!!!!! More to come) Pints 35 min.   Quarts 45 min.
    • Tomato Juice Pints 35 min.      Quarts 40 Minutes.

    These are the times for Ohio, if you live in a higher altitude location it can range from 5 – 15 minutes additional.  Check your local agriculture site.

    Now comes the fun one!  PRESSURE CANNING.

    Please learn how to use a Pressure Canner and maintenance and check it well before you use.  They can be dangerous.  You will be canning at 11 lbs of pressure but you want to check for the altitude adjustments for you area.The vegetables listed here are for NON PICKLED.  Canning pickles is another category for another time.

    • Meats        Pints 75 min        Quarts 90 min
    • Fish            Pints 100 min      Quarts 100 min
    • Asparagus Pints 30 min        Quarts 40 min
    • Beans (snap, wax, green, yellow, purple) Pints 20 min  Quarts 25 min
    • Beans, Lima   Pints 40 min     Quarts 50 minutes
    • Beets             Pints 30 min      Quarts 35 minutes
    • Broccoli        Pints 25 min      Quarts 40 min (better frozen)
    • Brussels Sprouts  Pints 45 min  Quarts 55 min (better frozen)
    • Cabbage         Pints 45 min    Quarts   55 min
    • Carrots        Pints 25 min         Quarts 30 min
    • Cauliflower   Pints 25 min        Quarts 40 min
    • Corn             Pints   55 min.         Quarts 85 min
    • Greens          Pints 70 min           Quarts 90 min
    • Hominy        Pints 60 min           Quarts 70 min
    • Mushrooms   Pints 45 min        QUARTS NO NO NO!
    • Okra             Pints 25 min            Quarts 40 min (Better frozen)
    • Onions         Pints 40 min              Quarts 40 min
    • Parsnips      Pints 20 min            Quarts 25 min
    • Peas              Pints 40 min            Quarts 40 min  (much better frozen)
    • Peppers, green  Pints 35 min     Quarts 35 min
    • Peppers, hot     Pints 35 min        Quarts 35 min
    • Potatoes NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
    • Pumpkin (in chunks not pureed)  Pints 55 min  Quarts 90 min.
    • Rutabagas    Pints 35 min         Quarts  35 min.
    • Squash, winter (in chunks not pureed)  Pints 55 min   Quarts 90 minutes.
    • Turnips      Pints 20 min.            Quarts 25 min.

    So those are the times for the sizes of what I do most.  If you have any questions please feel free to send me an email and I will get back to you.

    Until Next Time,

    Mrs. Kay L. Rice